You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 121-140 of 360 results found

Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

Novel fusion proteins with good stability and potency against HIV-1. These fusion proteins have good drug properties and potential as prophylactics or therapeutics against HIV-1 infection. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for the development and commercialization of novel fusion proteins as therapeutics or prophylactics against HIV-1 infection.

Gene Signature for Predicting Solid Tumors Patient Prognosis

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis seeks parties to license or co-develop a method of predicting the prognosis of a patient diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or breast cancer by detecting expression of one or more cancer-associated genes, and a method of identifying an agent for use in treating HCC.

Gene-based Diagnostic Predicts Patient Response to Cancer Immunotherapy

Somatic mutations can alter the sensitivity of tumors to T-cell mediated immunotherapy. Identifying genes that positively regulate the sensitivity of cancer cells to T-cell mediated clearance is key for effective treatment in cancer patients. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have identified a panel of genes which are useful in predicting a patient’s response to immunotherapy. NCI seeks partners to co-develop or license the technology toward commercialization.

Genetic Assay for Transcription Errors: Methods to Monitor Treatments or Chemicals that Increase the Error Rate of RNA synthesis

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a genetic assay for detecting transcription errors in RNA synthesis. This new assay extends the familiar concept of an Ames test which monitors DNA damage and synthesis errors to the previously inaccessible issue of RNA synthesis fidelity. The FDA requires genetic DNA focused tests for all drug approval as it assesses the in vivo mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a drug. The new assay will open an approach to monitoring the impact of treatments on the accuracy of RNA synthesis. Errors in transcription have been hypothesized to be a component of aging and age-related diseases. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing partners for the genetic assay.

Genetically Engineered Mouse-Derived Allograft for Preclinical Studies of Metastatic Melanoma

Researchers at NCI have developed a means of more closely simulating in mouse models both melanoma cancer itself and the resulting physiological an immunological response by creating a genetically engineered mice (GEM)-derived allograft (GDA).  This allograft both resembles human-like melanoma and has features that will stimulate a normal immunological response in the mouse.

Genetically Engineered Myeloid Cells (GEMys) as a Platform to Enhance Anti-Tumor Immunity

There is a marked increase in immunosuppressive myeloid progenitors and myeloid cells in tumors and at metastatic tissue sites, rendering these types of cells useful in cancer therapeutics, especially after genetic modifications that improve their anti-tumor properties further. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development or licensing partners to further develop genetically engineered myeloid cells (GEMys) for use in cancer immunotherapy.

Griffithsin-Based Anti-viral Therapeutics with Improved Stability and Solubility

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory have modified the Cnidarin-derived griffithsin compound to have greater storage time and stability. Griffithsin compounds are a class of highly potent proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T cells. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to license or co-develop large-scale recombinant production of the compound.

GTF2I Mutations as a Genetic Marker for Prognosis of Thymic Malignancies

Despite the growing number of biomarkers that are used for diagnosing and treating carcinomas in general, cancers of the thymus are still diagnosed, stratified and treated by a costly combination of histology, surgery and radiological procedures.  The lack of qualified biomarkers associated with thymomas and thymic carcinomas has also hampered the development of targeted therapies. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a prognostic PCR based test for thymic malignancies.

High Affinity Cross Species Single Domain Antibodies Targeting Mesothelin

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two high affinity anti-mesothelin single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies), A101 and G8. These antibodies have been isolated from NCI’s newly developed camel single domain (VHH) libraries by phage display. The antibodies have a high affinity for mesothelin-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-1

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two Glypican-1- (GPC1)- specific antibodies: the mouse monoclonal antibody HM2 that binds the C-lobe of GPC1 close to the cell surface, and the camel single domain antibody D4. The D4 single domain antibody (also called ‘nanobody’) has a high affinity for GPC1-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 for Treating Childhood Cancers

Cancer therapies that specifically target Glypican 2 (GPC2) are strong therapeutic candidates for pediatric patients with neuroblastoma and other GPC2 expressing cancers. The inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed and isolated two new antibodies that target GPC2 (CT3 and CT5) that are available for licensing and co-development.

High-throughput Assay to Identify New Cancer Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to evaluate or commercialize a diagnostic tool that can identify new drugs that increase chromosome instability.

Highly Soluble Pyrimido-Dione-Quinoline Compounds: Small Molecules that Stabilize and Activate p53 in Transformed Cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention reporting the composition and function of a pyrimido-dione-quinoline that was found to inhibit HDM2’s ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity without accompanying genotoxicity. The current invention results in the stabilization of p53 in cells through the inhibition of its ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation resulting in a robust p53 response in tumors. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

Pages