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Convolutional Neural Networks for Organ Segmentation

Computer automated segmentation of high variability organs and disease features in medical images is uniquely difficult. The application of deep learning and specialized neural networks may allow for automation of such interpretation tasks that are currently only performed by trained physicians. Computer automation may improve image analysis capabilities and lead to better diagnostics, disease monitoring, and surgical planning for many diseases. To help solve this challenge, researchers at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed a technology that trains a computer to read and segment certain highly variable image features.

Detection of Colorectal Cancer with Two Novel Heme-Related Molecules in Human Feces

Mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC) can be reduced by detecting the cancer or its precursor, colorectal adenoma (CRA), so that it can be removed at an early stage.  Current tests involve screening stool specimens for blood, especially for hemoglobin.  The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for hemoglobin is positive in stool for only about 60% of early-stage and 85% of advanced CRC cases, with a false-positive rate of less than 10%.  Researchers at the NCI have developed an assay with better accuracy and seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the commercialization of the assay.

Detection of Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Water Supplies

Testing for biological activity of glucocorticoids and many other steroid endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has not been previously performed. An automated, highly reproducible, and low cost assay detects biologically active steroidal EDCs and is suitable for wide application in testing water samples. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative co-development research and/or licensing to move this technology into the public domain.

Device for Growing Mammalian Cells on EM Grids

A device used to hold transmission electron microscopy grids that allows adherent mammalian cells to grow on and the 3D printing software to create the device, which the NCI seeks to license.

Device for Simulating Explosive Blast and Imaging Biological Specimens

Researchers at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) developed a device simulating a blast shock wave of the type produced by explosive devices such as bombs. The invention allows for the real-time study of blast effects on in vitro cell models. NICHD researchers seek licensing opportunities to further develop this device.

Device to guide oxygen over cells for photo-oxidation

Device is used to guide a stream of oxygen or carbon dioxide over a dish of cells during fluorescence microscopy. Invention includes the 3D printing software to create the device. The device makes it possible to easily provide a steady source of oxygen or carbon dioxide to cells while operating a fluorescent microscope to oxidize fluorophores for later visualization in electron microscopy. NCI seeks commercial partners to license this technology.

Devices for Improved Tissue Cryopreservation and Recovery

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI), have developed a cryopreservation and cell recovery system designed specifically for the efficient cryopreservation, transportation and subsequent thawing of monolayers and tissues on a substrate. This closed cryopreservation/defrost system allows for sterility in addition to increased viability, recovery and safety of tissues that can be used for in vitro culture or surgical transplantation.

Diagnostic Assays for the Detection of Thyroid Cancer

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child and Human Development’s (NICHD) Pediatric Growth and Nutrition Branch seek partners to co-develop a diagnostic assay to detect thyroid cancer.

Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C

NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

Engineered Biological Pacemakers

The National Institute on Aging's Cellular Biophysics Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological pacemakers.

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