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Showing 1-20 of 35 results found

Bacteriophage Based-Vaccine System

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an engineered bacteriophage lambda () vector for displaying antigens to be used as a vaccine in treatment of cancers and infectious diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of the Bacteriophage based-vaccine system.

T-cell Receptor Targeting Human Papillomavirus-16 E6 Oncoprotein

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that confers high-avidity recognition of the HPV-specific oncoprotein E6. The TCR may be used in an adoptive cell therapy approach utilizing genetically engineered lymphocytes to treat HPV-positive malignancies.

Novel Human Immunogenic Epitopes of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus ERVMER34-1

Researchers at the NCI developed immunologically active peptides of the human endogenous retrovirus ERVMER34-1 that bind to human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA-A2) and elicit multifunctional T cell responses in cancer patients. These peptides and associated agonist epitopes can be used to develop cancer vaccines for the prevention and/or treatment of several cancer types. NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners to commercialize this invention.

T-cell Receptor Targeting Human Papillomavirus-16 E7 Oncoprotein

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that confers high-avidity recognition of the HPV-specific oncoprotein E7. The TCR may be used in an adoptive cell therapy approach utilizing genetically engineered lymphocytes to treat HPV-positive malignancies.

Molecular Nanotags for Detection of Single Molecules

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel molecular nanotags for single biological nanoparticle detection, resolution, and sorting, by flow cytometry. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further advance this technology with extremely broad biomedical, biodefense, industrial, environmental, and other applications.

Sensitive and Economic RNA Virus Detection Using a Novel RNA Preparation Method

The National Eye Institute seeks research and co-development partners and/or licensees to: (1) advance the production and uses of the new RNA preparation method; (2) manufacture reagent kits for testing in patients with suspected COVID-19 and other DNA/RNA viruses, and (3) manufacture reagent kits for patient biomarker profiles and inherited disease diagnostics.

Methods of Producing Thymic Emigrants from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of T cells for a variety of clinical applications. However, current in vitro methods of T cell differentiation result in the generation of cells with aberrant phenotypes. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have now developed methodology for generating induced pluripotent stem cell thymic emigrants (iTE). Antigen-specific CD8αβ+ iTEs exhibited functional properties in vitro that were almost indistinguishable from natural naïve CD8αβ+ T cells, including vigorous expansion and robust anti-tumor activity. iTEs recapitulated many of the transcriptional programs of naïve T cells in vivo and revealed a striking capacity for engraftment, memory formation, and efficient tumor destruction. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Peptide Hydrogels for Rate-Controlled Delivery of Therapeutics

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel delivery platform in which the scaffold of an anionic hydrogel (AcVES3) can be attenuated to deliver therapeutic small molecules, peptides, proteins, nanoparticles, or whole cells. The NCI seeks collaborators and licensees for the development of this technology in various clinical and laboratory applications.

Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Diagnostic Assay for Determining Patient Response to Apoptosis-related Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a multiplex assay to determine the efficacy of apoptosis-related drugs targeting the Bcl2 family of proteins or aid in the selection of cancer patients likely to respond. The NCI seeks partners for co-development or licensees for commercialization of novel immunoassays for determining or predicting patient response to cancer therapy.

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

New Insect Sf9-ET Cell Line for Determining Baculovirus Titers

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing partners for a novel modified insect cell line, Sf9-ET, that can quickly and efficiently determine baculovirus titers during the expression of recombinant proteins from a baculovirus-based protein expression system.

Methods for Producing Stem Cell-Like Memory T Cells for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research & co-development and/or licensees for a novel, ex vivo method by which stem cell-like memory T cells (Tscm) can be generated by stimulating naïve T cells in the presence of inhibitors of GSK-3beta, which are capable of activating the Wnt pathway. These Tscm cells, generated using GSK-3beta inhibitors, display enhanced survival and proliferation upon transfer, have multipotent capacity to generate all memory and effector T cell subsets, and show increased anti-tumor activity in a humanized mouse tumor model.

Renal Selective Unsaturated Englerin Analogues

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a number of analogs of the natural product englerin A, an inhibitor of renal cancer cell growth. Englerin A is thought to exert its anticancer effects by activating protein kinase C (PKC) theta, and exert cytotoxic effects through activation of transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels. The invention englerin analogues provide promising treatment strategies for various cancers, diabetes, and HIV, and other diseases associated with the PKC theta and/or TRPC ion channel proteins. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for englerin A analogue compounds.

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