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Vaccines for HIV

The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

Synthetic Bacterial Nanoparticles as Drug and Vaccine Delivery Vehicles

Engineered bacterial spores can provide many useful functions such as the treatment of infections, use as an adjuvant for the delivery of vaccines, and the enzymatic degradation of environmental pollutants. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology have developed a novel, synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayer (SSHEL) particle that is uniquely suited for a variety of these functions. NCI seeks partners to license and/or co-develop this technology toward commercialization.

Conserved Elements Vaccine for HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a DNA vaccine using conserved elements of HIV-1 Gag, administered in a prime-boost vaccination protocol. Two of the HIV Gag CE DNA vectors have been tested in a rhesus macaque model. Priming with the Gag CE vaccine and boosting with full length Gag DNA showed increased immune responses when compared to vaccination with Gag alone. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development this DNA vaccine.

Enhanced Immunogenicity Against HIV-1 Using a DNA-prime Poxvirus Vaccination

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research co-development or licenses for a method of stimulating an immune response in a human at risk for infection by, or already infected with, an HIV-1 retrovirus. This method utilizes DNA vaccines to stimulate CD8+ T cell immune responses.

Immunogens for Use in a High Efficacy HIV Vaccine

Prevention and control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections require a vaccine providing long-lasting protection. The most promising vaccine up to date consists of a regimen of immunization with genetically engineered HIV proteins, including the surface glycoprotein gp120, with a resulting efficacy of ~30%. Recent evidence indicates antibodies produced against variable envelope region 2 (V2) of gp120 in primates are associated with higher levels of protection, while antibodies produced against variable envelope region 1 (V1) have an opposite and interfering effect. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and New York University (NYU) have developed V1-deleted gp120 immunogens using Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and observed an increase in antibodies against V2 in macaques upon immunization. NCI is seeking parties interested in co-developing and/or licensing V1-deleted gp120 immunogens for their use in an improved HIV vaccine.

Adjuvanted Mucosal Subunit Vaccines for Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Transmission and Infection

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered an adjuvanted mucosal subunit vaccine to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission and infection. The mucosal vaccine is composed of a novel molecular adjuvant nanoparticle that induces robust humoral and cellular immunity, as well as trained innate immunity with enhanced protection against respiratory SARS-CoV-2 exposure. The technology is available for potential licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.