You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 1-20 of 57 results found

Adjuvanted Mucosal Subunit Vaccines for Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Transmission and Infection

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered an adjuvanted mucosal subunit vaccine to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission and infection. The mucosal vaccine is composed of a novel molecular adjuvant nanoparticle that induces robust humoral and cellular immunity, as well as trained innate immunity with enhanced protection against respiratory SARS-CoV-2 exposure. The technology is available for potential licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.

HIV-1 IN Mutant in a Single Round Vector

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks potential non-exclusive licensees for a collection of mutated single-round vectors for testing of potential Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor (INSTI) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor drugs.

A Murine Model of Inflammation Based on Chronic Expression of Interferon-Gamma

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has a novel mouse model of autoimmunity based on chronic interferon-gamma expression (ARE-Del). This mouse can be used as an in vivo model to study female-biased autoimmune diseases, including: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Primary Biliary Cholangitis, and Ovarian Failure Syndrome.

Immunogens for Use in a High Efficacy HIV Vaccine

Prevention and control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections require a vaccine providing long-lasting protection. The most promising vaccine up to date consists of a regimen of immunization with genetically engineered HIV proteins, including the surface glycoprotein gp120, with a resulting efficacy of ~30%. Recent evidence indicates antibodies produced against variable envelope region 2 (V2) of gp120 in primates are associated with higher levels of protection, while antibodies produced against variable envelope region 1 (V1) have an opposite and interfering effect. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and New York University (NYU) have developed V1-deleted gp120 immunogens using Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and observed an increase in antibodies against V2 in macaques upon immunization. NCI is seeking parties interested in co-developing and/or licensing V1-deleted gp120 immunogens for their use in an improved HIV vaccine.

Polymer-Cast Inserts for Cell Histology and Microscopy

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks co-development partners and/or licensees for polymer-cast inserts for cell histology and microscopy; a system for high throughput three-dimensional (3D) cell culture and screening microscopy.

Synergistic Use of Exo VII Inhibitors And Quinolone Antibiotics For Treating Bacterial Infection

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a bacterial exonuclease VII (ExoVII) inhibitor that increases the potency of widely used quinolone antibiotics targeting prokaryotic type IIA topoisomerases. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of ExoVII inhibitors as new antibiotic adjuvants to boost the efficacy of quinolone antibiotics and/or restore the susceptibility of resistant bacteria.

Methods of Producing Thymic Emigrants from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of T cells for a variety of clinical applications. However, current in vitro methods of T cell differentiation result in the generation of cells with aberrant phenotypes. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have now developed methodology for generating induced pluripotent stem cell thymic emigrants (iTE). Antigen-specific CD8αβ+ iTEs exhibited functional properties in vitro that were almost indistinguishable from natural naïve CD8αβ+ T cells, including vigorous expansion and robust anti-tumor activity. iTEs recapitulated many of the transcriptional programs of naïve T cells in vivo and revealed a striking capacity for engraftment, memory formation, and efficient tumor destruction. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

RNASEH-Assisted Detection Assay for RNA

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development and commercialization of a diagnostic assay that detects sequence-specific (viral) RNA.

Peptide Hydrogels for Rate-Controlled Delivery of Therapeutics

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel delivery platform in which the scaffold of an anionic hydrogel (AcVES3) can be attenuated to deliver therapeutic small molecules, peptides, proteins, nanoparticles, or whole cells. The NCI seeks collaborators and licensees for the development of this technology in various clinical and laboratory applications.

Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Diagnostic Assay for Determining Patient Response to Apoptosis-related Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a multiplex assay to determine the efficacy of apoptosis-related drugs targeting the Bcl2 family of proteins or aid in the selection of cancer patients likely to respond. The NCI seeks partners for co-development or licensees for commercialization of novel immunoassays for determining or predicting patient response to cancer therapy.

Novel HPPK (Bacterial Protein) Inhibitors for Use as Antibacterial Agents

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed several novel small-molecule inhibitors directed against HPPK, a bacterial protein, as potential antimicrobial agents. The NCI seeks co-development partners or licensees to further develop these novel small-molecule HPPK inhibitors as broad-spectrum bactericidal agents.

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

Pages