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Griffithsin-Based Anti-viral Therapeutics with Improved Stability and Solubility

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory have modified the Cnidarin-derived griffithsin compound to have greater storage time and stability. Griffithsin compounds are a class of highly potent proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T cells. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to license or co-develop large-scale recombinant production of the compound.

Synthetic Bacterial Nanoparticles as Drug and Vaccine Delivery Vehicles

Engineered bacterial spores can provide many useful functions such as the treatment of infections, use as an adjuvant for the delivery of vaccines, and the enzymatic degradation of environmental pollutants. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology have developed a novel, synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayer (SSHEL) particle that is uniquely suited for a variety of these functions. NCI seeks partners to license and/or co-develop this technology toward commercialization.

Module to Freeze and Store Frozen Tissue

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an engineered storage unit for frozen tissue, that provides a permanent base on which to mount tissue frozen in OCT and an enclosure for storage. The unit provides for chain-of-custody labeling and acts as an insulating container to protect the specimen. Other elements include devices for freezing the tissue to the base, as well as a holder for the base to facilitate cryosectioning. Application of the storage system allows a frozen tissue specimen to be moved between storage and cryosectioning without loss of label, deformation of tissue, or thermal alterations.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

Conserved Elements Vaccine for HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a DNA vaccine using conserved elements of HIV-1 Gag, administered in a prime-boost vaccination protocol. Two of the HIV Gag CE DNA vectors have been tested in a rhesus macaque model. Priming with the Gag CE vaccine and boosting with full length Gag DNA showed increased immune responses when compared to vaccination with Gag alone. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development this DNA vaccine.

Micro-Dose Calibrator for Pre-clinical Radiotracer Assays

Pre-clinical radiotracer biomedical research involves the use of compounds labeled with radioisotopes, including radio-ligand bio-distribution studies, cell binding studies, immune cell labeling techniques, and α-based therapies. Before this Micro-Dose Calibrator, measurement of pre-clinical level dosage for small animal studies was inaccurate and unreliable. This dose calibrator is a prototype ready for customer testing and scale-up. It is designed to accurately measure radioactive doses in the range of 50 nCi (1.8 kBq) to 100 µCi (3.7 MBq) with 99% precision. The NCI seeks co-development or licensing to commercialize it. Alternative uses will be considered.

A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

Polymeric Delivery Platform for Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a polymeric drug delivery platform that targets scavenger receptor A1 (SR-A1), a receptor highly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells (myeloid lineages), and endothelial cells. The platform delivers various immunomodulatory therapeutic cargo including small molecule drugs, therapeutic peptides, and vaccines, to the lymphatic system and myeloid/antigen presenting cell (APC) sub-populations.

Microosmometer for the Study of a Wide Range of Biological, Macromolecular, Polymeric, Gel, or Other Samples

Scientists at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) have discovered that changes in the osmotic pressure of tissue or hydroscopic samples having a mass of less than about one microgram and that can exert a high osmotic pressure can be measured by this method. The NICHD seeks research and co-development or licensees for a method of measuring small physical changes in small quantities of materials.

Scytovirin Domain 1 Related Polypeptides

Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for novel anti-HIV peptide therapeutics. The researchers developed novel proteins for HIV inhibition. Scytovirin is a potent anti-HIV protein with two domains having strong symmetry. NCI researchers produced a much smaller, functional, scytovirin domain polypeptide – SD1 – for use as a HIV therapeutic.

Targeted RNA/DNA Nanoparticles with Single Stranded RNA Toeholds

The technology is directed to the use of single-stranded RNA overhangs or toeholds of varying lengths (< 12 nucleotides) contained in nucleic acid-based nanoparticles which trigger the association of these nanoparticles and activates multiple functionalities such as gene silencing and/or cell-specific targeting. The use of RNA toeholds is superior to that of DNA toeholds in that it allows for smaller nanoparticles (fewer nucleotides for the toeholds) resulting in greater chemical stability, less immunogenic and higher yield of production. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for use of RNA overhangs or toeholds in nucleic acid nanoparticles.

Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

Novel fusion proteins with good stability and potency against HIV-1. These fusion proteins have good drug properties and potential as prophylactics or therapeutics against HIV-1 infection. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for the development and commercialization of novel fusion proteins as therapeutics or prophylactics against HIV-1 infection.

Enhanced Immunogenicity Against HIV-1 Using a DNA-prime Poxvirus Vaccination

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research co-development or licenses for a method of stimulating an immune response in a human at risk for infection by, or already infected with, an HIV-1 retrovirus. This method utilizes DNA vaccines to stimulate CD8+ T cell immune responses.

Improved HIV Vaccines Through Ras Activation

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Vaccine Branch, seeks research co-development or licenses for a novel method of improving HIV vaccine efficacy by activating Ras signaling. Upregulating the Ras pathway can improve an HIV patient’s immune response to anti-retroviral vaccines.

Renal Selective Unsaturated Englerin Analogues

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a number of analogs of the natural product englerin A, an inhibitor of renal cancer cell growth. Englerin A is thought to exert its anticancer effects by activating protein kinase C (PKC) theta, and exert cytotoxic effects through activation of transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels. The invention englerin analogues provide promising treatment strategies for various cancers, diabetes, and HIV, and other diseases associated with the PKC theta and/or TRPC ion channel proteins. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for englerin A analogue compounds.

A Triple Combination HIV Microbicide

Three anti-HIV proteins- the antiviral lectin cyanovirin, the antiviral lectin griffithsin, and the monoclonal antibody 2G12- have been successfully expressed in the same rice seed. The co-expression allows for a low cost, stable production method for a triple anti-HIV microbicide for the prevention of HIV. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for the invention microbicide and production method.

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