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A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

A Triple Combination HIV Microbicide

Three anti-HIV proteins- the antiviral lectin cyanovirin, the antiviral lectin griffithsin, and the monoclonal antibody 2G12- have been successfully expressed in the same rice seed. The co-expression allows for a low cost, stable production method for a triple anti-HIV microbicide for the prevention of HIV. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for the invention microbicide and production method.

Anti-bacterial Treatments Using Peptide-Based Inhibitors of the STAT3-IL10 Pathway

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that typically affects the lungs. Current therapies include a panel of antibiotics given over a range of 6-9 months. As a result of the expense of treatment, the extended timeframe needed for effective treatment, and the scarcity of medicines in some developing countries, patient compliance with TB treatment is very low and results in multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). There remains a need for a faster, more effective treatment for TB. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development of peptide inhibitors of STAT3 and IL-10 developed to treat bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. See aslo: NIH inventions E-164-2007 and E-167-2010

Anti-Viral Compounds that Inhibit HIV Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Targets Laboratory is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antiviral tropolone derivatives developed by systematic medicinal chemistry on the lead series.

Conserved Elements Vaccine for HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a DNA vaccine using conserved elements of HIV-1 Gag, administered in a prime-boost vaccination protocol. Two of the HIV Gag CE DNA vectors have been tested in a rhesus macaque model. Priming with the Gag CE vaccine and boosting with full length Gag DNA showed increased immune responses when compared to vaccination with Gag alone. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development this DNA vaccine.

Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Diagnostic Assay for Determining Patient Response to Apoptosis-related Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a multiplex assay to determine the efficacy of apoptosis-related drugs targeting the Bcl2 family of proteins or aid in the selection of cancer patients likely to respond. The NCI seeks partners for co-development or licensees for commercialization of novel immunoassays for determining or predicting patient response to cancer therapy.

Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C

NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

Enhanced Immunogenicity Against HIV-1 Using a DNA-prime Poxvirus Vaccination

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research co-development or licenses for a method of stimulating an immune response in a human at risk for infection by, or already infected with, an HIV-1 retrovirus. This method utilizes DNA vaccines to stimulate CD8+ T cell immune responses.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

Novel fusion proteins with good stability and potency against HIV-1. These fusion proteins have good drug properties and potential as prophylactics or therapeutics against HIV-1 infection. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for the development and commercialization of novel fusion proteins as therapeutics or prophylactics against HIV-1 infection.

Griffithsin-Based Anti-viral Therapeutics with Improved Stability and Solubility

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory have modified the Cnidarin-derived griffithsin compound to have greater storage time and stability. Griffithsin compounds are a class of highly potent proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T cells. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to license or co-develop large-scale recombinant production of the compound.

Human Antibodies Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antibody-based therapeutic against MERS-CoV, including animal studies, cGMP manufacturing, and clinical trials.

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