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CytoSig: A Software Platform for Predicting Cytokine Signaling Activities, Target Discovery, and Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) from Transcriptomic Profiles

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed the Cytokine Signaling Analyzer (CytoSig), a software-based platform that provides both a database of target genes modulated by cytokines and a predictive model of cytokine signaling cascades from transcriptomic profiles. NCI seeks collaborators or licensees to advance the development of CytoSig for research, target discovery, or as a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS).

SMAD3 Reporter Mouse for Assessing TGF-ß/Activin Pathway Activation

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel mouse for the detection of TGF-ß signaling. This mouse provides the opportunity to study TGF-ß signaling in vivo and may be a useful model for preclinical pharmacology studies. The NCI seeks licensees for the TGF-ß reporter mouse.

Exo-Clean Technology for Purifying Extracellular Vesicle Preparations from Contaminants

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel biophysical technique to purify extracellular vesicles (EVs) from contaminants such as proteins and unbound labels. The NCI seeks licensees and/or co-development research collaborations to further advance this technology for EV-based biomarkers and therapeutics to treat a wide range of diseases.

Optimized Monospecific or Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed improved monospecific and bicistronic chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 and CD20. Importantly, CD19 and CD20 are highly expressed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia and other B-cell lymphomas. These improved CARs can be useful in treating these diseases. NCI is seeking parties interested in the co-development or licensing of this invention for immunotherapy.

In vitro Generation of an Autologous Thymic Organoid from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

The thymus is the only organ capable of producing conventional, mature T cells; a crucial part of the adaptive immune system. However, its efficiency and function are progressively reduced as we age, leading to a compromised immune system in the elderly. Moreover, production of T cells with specific receptors is an important concern for cancer immunotherapy. Current in vitro methods produce immature T cells that are not useful for therapy. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have generated an autologous thymic organoid from human pluripotent stem cells to address this problem. The organoid can be used to develop clinical applications such as production of autologous T and natural killer T (NKT) cells and reconstitution of the adaptive immune system. NCI is seeking licensees for the thymic organoid and the method of its generation to be used in a variety of clinical applications.

Time Efficient Multi-Pulsed Field Gradient (mPFG) MRI Without Concomitant Gradient Field Artifacts

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of diffusion tensor distribution imaging (DTD-MRI) in assessing disease (e.g., cancer), normal and abnormal developmental processes, degeneration and trauma in the brain and other soft tissues, and other applications.

Efficient Methods to Prepare Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in vitro for Therapeutic Use

Multi-potential hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) can differentiate into any class of blood cells, and are highly useful in regenerative medicine, immunology, and cancer immunotherapy. Current methods to generate HPCs are limited either due to the use of animal products, or the high cost and low efficiency of animal product free systems. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a protocol to prepare HPCs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture condition. Thus, they are able to generate HPCs in a fully human, autologous system, which can be used to further generate immune cells for therapy. This protocol is adaptable to mass production by bioreactors. NCI seeks licensees for these methods of generating HPCs in a 3D co-culture with hMSCs to be used in a variety of applications such as treatment of blood disorders, regenerative medicine, and antibody production.

Peptide Hydrogels for Rate-Controlled Delivery of Therapeutics

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel delivery platform in which the scaffold of an anionic hydrogel (AcVES3) can be attenuated to deliver therapeutic small molecules, peptides, proteins, nanoparticles, or whole cells. The NCI seeks collaborators and licensees for the development of this technology in various clinical and laboratory applications.

Micro-Dose Calibrator for Pre-clinical Radiotracer Assays

Pre-clinical radiotracer biomedical research involves the use of compounds labeled with radioisotopes, including radio-ligand bio-distribution studies, cell binding studies, immune cell labeling techniques, and α-based therapies. Before this Micro-Dose Calibrator, measurement of pre-clinical level dosage for small animal studies was inaccurate and unreliable. This dose calibrator is a prototype ready for customer testing and scale-up. It is designed to accurately measure radioactive doses in the range of 50 nCi (1.8 kBq) to 100 µCi (3.7 MBq) with 99% precision. The NCI seeks co-development or licensing to commercialize it. Alternative uses will be considered.

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

Cancer Therapeutic based on Stimulation of Natural Killer T-cell Anti-tumor Activity

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute''s Vaccine Branch have found that beta-mannosylceramide (Beta-ManCer) promotes immunity in an IFN-gamma independent mechanism and seek statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize beta-ManCer.

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