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A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

A Murine Model of Inflammation Based on Chronic Expression of Interferon-Gamma

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has a novel mouse model of autoimmunity based on chronic interferon-gamma expression (ARE-Del). This mouse can be used as an in vivo model to study female-biased autoimmune diseases, including: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Primary Biliary Cholangitis, and Ovarian Failure Syndrome.

Polymer-Cast Inserts for Cell Histology and Microscopy

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks co-development partners and/or licensees for polymer-cast inserts for cell histology and microscopy; a system for high throughput three-dimensional (3D) cell culture and screening microscopy.

Polymeric Delivery Platform for Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a polymeric drug delivery platform that targets scavenger receptor A1 (SR-A1), a receptor highly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells (myeloid lineages), and endothelial cells. The platform delivers various immunomodulatory therapeutic cargo including small molecule drugs, therapeutic peptides, and vaccines, to the lymphatic system and myeloid/antigen presenting cell (APC) sub-populations.

Diagnostic Assay for Determining Patient Response to Apoptosis-related Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a multiplex assay to determine the efficacy of apoptosis-related drugs targeting the Bcl2 family of proteins or aid in the selection of cancer patients likely to respond. The NCI seeks partners for co-development or licensees for commercialization of novel immunoassays for determining or predicting patient response to cancer therapy.

Novel Fusion Proteins for HIV Vaccine

The National Cancer Institute’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties to license gp120 and CD4-induced antibody fusion proteins for use in an HIV vaccine.

Peptide Inhibitors for Viral Infections and as Anti-inflammatory Agents

IFN-gamma and IL-10 are cytokine signaling molecules that play fundamental roles in inflammation, cancer growth and autoimmune diseases.  Unfortunately, there are no specific inhibitors of IFN-gamma or IL-10 on the market to date. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop selective IL-10 and IFN-gamma peptide inhibitors.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

Cancer Therapeutic based on Stimulation of Natural Killer T-cell Anti-tumor Activity

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute''s Vaccine Branch have found that beta-mannosylceramide (Beta-ManCer) promotes immunity in an IFN-gamma independent mechanism and seek statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize beta-ManCer.

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

Anti-bacterial Treatments Using Peptide-Based Inhibitors of the STAT3-IL10 Pathway

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that typically affects the lungs. Current therapies include a panel of antibiotics given over a range of 6-9 months. As a result of the expense of treatment, the extended timeframe needed for effective treatment, and the scarcity of medicines in some developing countries, patient compliance with TB treatment is very low and results in multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). There remains a need for a faster, more effective treatment for TB. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development of peptide inhibitors of STAT3 and IL-10 developed to treat bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. See aslo: NIH inventions E-164-2007 and E-167-2010

Peptide Hydrogels for Rate-Controlled Delivery of Therapeutics

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel delivery platform in which the scaffold of an anionic hydrogel (AcVES3) can be attenuated to deliver therapeutic small molecules, peptides, proteins, nanoparticles, or whole cells. The NCI seeks collaborators and licensees for the development of this technology in various clinical and laboratory applications.

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