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In vitro Generation of an Autologous Thymic Organoid from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

The thymus is the only organ capable of producing conventional, mature T cells; a crucial part of the adaptive immune system. However, its efficiency and function are progressively reduced as we age, leading to a compromised immune system in the elderly. Moreover, production of T cells with specific receptors is an important concern for cancer immunotherapy. Current in vitro methods produce immature T cells that are not useful for therapy. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have generated an autologous thymic organoid from human pluripotent stem cells to address this problem. The organoid can be used to develop clinical applications such as production of autologous T and natural killer T (NKT) cells and reconstitution of the adaptive immune system. NCI is seeking licensees for the thymic organoid and the method of its generation to be used in a variety of clinical applications.

Efficient Methods to Prepare Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in vitro for Therapeutic Use

Multi-potential hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) can differentiate into any class of blood cells, and are highly useful in regenerative medicine, immunology, and cancer immunotherapy. Current methods to generate HPCs are limited either due to the use of animal products, or the high cost and low efficiency of animal product free systems. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a protocol to prepare HPCs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture condition. Thus, they are able to generate HPCs in a fully human, autologous system, which can be used to further generate immune cells for therapy. This protocol is adaptable to mass production by bioreactors. NCI seeks licensees for these methods of generating HPCs in a 3D co-culture with hMSCs to be used in a variety of applications such as treatment of blood disorders, regenerative medicine, and antibody production.

Use of Cucurbitacins and Withanolides for the Treatment of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer Inflammation Program, seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of certain cucurbatacins or withanolides in combination with pro-apoptotic agonists of TRAIL death receptors for cancer therapy.

Use of Acetalax for Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development and/or potential licensees for a potential novel treatment for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) with acetalax (oxyphenisatin acetate). Acetalax is a previously FDA approved drug that has been used as a topical laxative but is being repurposed here as an onco-therapy because of its cytotoxic effects on a number of TNBC and other cancer cell lines.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. The NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations.

Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Personalized Tumor Vaccine and Use Thereof for Cancer Immunotherapy

National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) seek licensees for a technology involving the preparation and use of personalized tumor vaccines for cancer immunotherapy employing a therapeutic strategy called MBTA. MBTA consists of vaccinations with irradiated tumor cells pulsed with phagocytic agonists (Mannan-BAM, a polysaccharide derivative of mannan), TLR (Toll-like receptor) ligands, and agonistic Anti-CD40-monoclonal antibody.

Aryl Hydantoin Heterocycle Compounds that Target the Androgen Receptor for Prostate Cancer Treatment

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed aryl hydantoin heterocycles that target the androgen receptor (AR). NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees to develop these compounds as therapeutics for prostate cancer. As these compounds consist of both AR agonists and antagonists, they may also be effective therapeutics for androgen dysfunctional disorders, such as androgen deficiency disorders or hyperandrogenism.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations

IgG4 Hinge Containing Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Glypican-1 For Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute have developed a glypican-1 (GPC1) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells using short immunoglobin subclass 4 (IgG4) hinge sequences that are highly potent against GPC1-expressing tumors. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees to advance the development of GPC1-IgG4 hinge CARs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other GPC1-expressing tumors.

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