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New Heterocyclic Scaffold-Based Inhibitors of the Polo-Box Domain of Polo-like Kinase 1 for the Treatment of Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) have developed novel heterocyclic scaffold-based inhibitors of the polo-box domain (PBD) of Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). These compounds effectively arrest mitotic progression and cell proliferation in cell-based assays. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop these inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) for Treatment of Solid Tumors

Scientists at National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Cancer Research (CCR) identified selective tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) inhibitors that may be used in combination with topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors for synergistic treatment of solid tumors. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for commercializing the TDP1 inhibitors as part of an anti-cancer therapy.

Increased Therapeutic Effectiveness of PE-Based Immunotoxins

To improve the therapeutic effectiveness of PE-based immunotoxins through multiple rounds of drug administration, NIH inventors have sought to identify and remove the human B cell epitopes within PE. Previous work demonstrated that the removal of the murine B cell and T cell epitopes from PE reduced the immunogenicity of PE and resulted in immunotoxins with improved therapeutic activity. The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Molecular Biology seeks interested parties to co-develop and commercialize immunotoxins using toxin domains lacking human B cell epitopes.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

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