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Combination of Near Infrared Photoimmunotherapy Targeting Cancer Cells and Host-Immune Activation

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek co-development partners and/or licensees for a new therapeutic approach that selectively targets cancer cells and prevents tumor regrowth. The novel method combines antibody-IR700 molecules and Near-Infrared Photo Immunotherapy (NIR-PIT), which has shown great potential in targeting tumors via a host immunogenic response, with already known and available anti-cancer immunomodulators to further enhance the antitumor response. The investigators have shown in mouse models that, when used in combination, NIR-PIT-treatment and standard antitumor agents conferred a potent vaccine-like effect, not only curing mice of local and distant cancers but successfully immunizing them against tumor regrowth.

Cancer Therapeutic Based on Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) Inhibitors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed small molecule compounds that inhibit activity of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). The HIF-1 inhibitor compounds are designed around the scaffold of naturally occurring metabolite eudistidine. The invention compounds have demonstrated activity against cancer and malaria in vitro.

Bacteriophage Based-Vaccine System

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed an engineered bacteriophage lambda () vector for displaying antigens to be used as a vaccine in treatment of cancers and infectious diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of the Bacteriophage based-vaccine system.

Zirconium-89 PET Imaging Agent for Cancer

This technology is a new generation of rationally designed chelating agents that improve the complexation of Zirconium-89 for PET imaging of cancers.

Overexpression of Phf19 on T Cells Enhances Therapeutic Effects of T Cell-Based Therapies (such as Chimeric Antigen Receptor [CAR] Therapies)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to epigenetically reprogram CD8+ T cell fate by expressing elevated levels of the polycomb-like protein, Phf19. This technology is useful for improving T cell-based immunotherapies (such as CAR therapies) to treat a range of infectious diseases and cancers. NCI seeks licensing or co-development partners for this invention.

IgG4 Hinge Containing Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Glypican-1 For Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute have developed a glypican-1 (GPC1) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells using short immunoglobin subclass 4 (IgG4) hinge sequences that are highly potent against GPC1-expressing tumors. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees to advance the development of GPC1-IgG4 hinge CARs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other GPC1-expressing tumors.

Monoclonal Antibodies and Immunoconjugates Directed to the Non-ShedPortion (“Stalk”) of Mesothelin are Excellent Candidates for Developing Therapeutic Agents

Antibodies that specifically recognize and bind to the unshed portion (“stalk”) of human mesothelin are strong therapeutic candidates because they maintain contact with the cancer cell for a longer duration than other anti-mesothelin antibodies that are currently available. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed such antibodies that specifically recognize and bind to the stalk of human mesothelin with high affinity. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

A Novel Genetically Encoded Inhibitor of Hippo Signaling Pathway to Study YAP1/TAZ-TEAD Dependent Events in Cancer

The Hippo signaling pathway is one of the most frequently altered pathways in human cancer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a genetically encoded peptide inhibitor of the Hippo signaling pathway members YAP1/TAZ-TEAD, to dissect and study the specific TEAD-downstream regulatory gene expression networks of cell proliferation, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell functions in different cell types and pathologies. The DNA construct encoding this inhibitor may be delivered to cells using lentivirus, adenovirus, or adeno-associated virus, and is a valuable research tool. NCI seeks licensees for this peptide inhibitor and the encoding DNA construct.

GTF2I Mutations as a Genetic Marker for Prognosis of Thymic Malignancies

Despite the growing number of biomarkers that are used for diagnosing and treating carcinomas in general, cancers of the thymus are still diagnosed, stratified and treated by a costly combination of histology, surgery and radiological procedures.  The lack of qualified biomarkers associated with thymomas and thymic carcinomas has also hampered the development of targeted therapies. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a prognostic PCR based test for thymic malignancies.

A Gene-Based Prognostic for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patient Response to Adjuvant Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

The gold standard of care for hepatocellular carcinoma patients with intermediate- to locally advanced tumors is transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), a procedure whereby the tumor is targeted both with local chemotherapy and restriction of local blood supply. NCI scientists have identified a 14-gene signature predictive of response to TACE, and NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners to develop the technology toward commercialization.

Method of Neoantigen-Reactive T Cell Receptor (TCR) Isolation from Peripheral Blood of Cancer Patients

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a novel method for isolation and construction of neoantigen-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of cancer patients. This method generates accurate scoring of single T cells from tumors, as well as facilitates identification and reconstruction of unknown TCRs for immunotherapy.

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