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High Affinity Cross Species Single Domain Antibodies Targeting Mesothelin

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two high affinity anti-mesothelin single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies), A101 and G8. These antibodies have been isolated from NCI’s newly developed camel single domain (VHH) libraries by phage display. The antibodies have a high affinity for mesothelin-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-1

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two Glypican-1- (GPC1)- specific antibodies: the mouse monoclonal antibody HM2 that binds the C-lobe of GPC1 close to the cell surface, and the camel single domain antibody D4. The D4 single domain antibody (also called ‘nanobody’) has a high affinity for GPC1-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

Human T Cell Receptors for Treating Cancer

T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins that recognize antigens in the context of infected or transformed cells and activate T cells to mediate an immune response and destroy abnormal cells. The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch seeks interested parties to license or co-develop the use of T cell receptors (TCRs) cloned against the SSX-2 antigen for the treatment of cancer.

Immunotherapeutics for Pediatric Solid Tumors

The National Cancer Institute’s Pediatric Oncology Branch seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop new immunotherapeutic agents based on chimeric antigen receptor (CARs) for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

In vitro Generation of an Autologous Thymic Organoid from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

The thymus is the only organ capable of producing conventional, mature T cells; a crucial part of the adaptive immune system. However, its efficiency and function are progressively reduced as we age, leading to a compromised immune system in the elderly. Moreover, production of T cells with specific receptors is an important concern for cancer immunotherapy. Current in vitro methods produce immature T cells that are not useful for therapy. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have generated an autologous thymic organoid from human pluripotent stem cells to address this problem. The organoid can be used to develop clinical applications such as production of autologous T and natural killer T (NKT) cells and reconstitution of the adaptive immune system. NCI is seeking licensees for the thymic organoid and the method of its generation to be used in a variety of clinical applications.

Inhibition of T Cell Differentiation and Senescence by Overexpression of Transcription Factor c-Myb

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method by which memory T cells can be generated from other T cell populations using overexpression of the transcription factor c-Myb. Importantly, these reprogrammed memory T cells show increased proliferative and survival capacity. This strategy could also potentially generate anti-tumor T cells with improved viability and therapeutic efficacy for adoptive ACT. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Knockout and Conditional Knockout Mice-GPR116

Pulmonary surfactant plays a critical role in preventing alveolar collapse by decreasing surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface. Surfactant deficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), common disorders that can afflict patients of all ages and carry a mortality rate greater than 25%. Excess surfactant leads to pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. NCI investigators created a G-protein coupled receptor GPR116 mutant mouse model and showed that GPR116 plays a previously unexpected, essential role in maintaining normal surfactant levels in the lung. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in collaborative research to license surfactant modulating agents for the treatment of surfactant related lung disorders.

MADCO-Accelerated Multidimensional Diffusion MRI

The marginal distribution constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is disclosed wherein a 2D (or higher-dimensional) spectrum is estimated from initial 1D marginal distribution data. These 1D marginal distributions are used as constraints in the reconstruction of the 2D spectra. MADCO accelerates and improves the reconstruction of multidimensional NMR relaxation/diffusion spectra, making it suitable for MRI applications on a voxel-by-voxel basis by vastly reducing the amount of data acquired and data necessary for creating MRI images.

Metastatic ovarian cancer mouse models and cell lines for preclinical studies

NCI's Center for Advanced Preclinical Research (CAPR) has developed a Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (SEOC) genetically engineered mouse model (GEM), GEM-derived SEOC orthotopic mouse model, and biological materials derived therefrom, with several key histopathologic, immunophenotypical, and genetic features of human SEOC. NCI CAPR seeks licensees for this technology.

Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells

The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

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