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Showing 21-40 of 145 results found

Bile Acids and Other Agents that Modulate the Gut Microbiome for the Treatment of Liver Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered that primary bile acids and antibiotics are a novel therapeutic for the treatment of liver cancer and liver metastases. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing primary bile acids and antibiotics that have been demonstrated in vivo to attract natural killer T (NKT) cells to the liver and inhibit tumor development.

Bioluminescent Bladder Cancer Cell Line for Tracking Cancer Progression

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a bioluminescent MB49-luciferase bladder cancer cell line that can be used in preclinical studies to evaluate anti-cancer agents in bladder cancer. NCI seeks parties to non-exclusively license this research material.

Biomarker signature development: microRNAs for biodosimetry

Alterations in microRNAs (miRNAs), a type of small non-coding RNAs, have been reported in cells/tumors subjected to radiation exposure, implying that miRNAs play an important role in cellular stress response to radiation. NCI researchers evaluated small non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), and mRNA, as potential non-invasive biomarkers for radiation biodosimetry. The NCI Radiation Oncology Branch seeks parties interested in licensing or co-development of RNA biomarker signature(s) for radiation biodosimetry.

Brachyury-directed Vaccine for the Prevention or Treatment of Cancers

Researchers at the NCI have developed a vaccine technology that stimulates the immune system to selectively destroy metastasizing cells. Stimulation of T cells with the Brachyury peptide promote a robust immune response and lead to targeted lysis of invasive tumor cells. NCI seeks licensing or co-development of this invention.

Cancer Immunotherapy Using Virus-like Particles

A considerable effort has been devoted to identifying and targeting specific extracellular cancer markers using antibody based therapies. However, diminished access to new cancer cell surface markers has limited the development of corresponding antibodies. NCI Technology Transfer Center is seeking to license cancer immunotherapy using virus-like particles.

Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant

The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

Cancer Vaccine Composed of Oligonucleotides Conjugated to Apoptotic Tumor Cells

Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing unmethylated Cytosine-Guanine (CpG) motifs mimic the immunostimulatory activity of bacterial DNA. CpG ODN directly stimulate B cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), promote the production of T Helper 1 cells (Th1) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and  trigger the maturation/activation of professional antigen presenting cells. The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, seeks interested parties to license methods for inducing an immune response to tumors.

Cancer-reactive T cells from Peripheral Blood

T-cells capable of reacting to mutations in cancer patients have potential use as therapeutics. Identifying and isolating these cells from patients is a crucial step in developing these treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from a patient’s peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The NCI, Surgery Branch, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize this method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from peripheral blood.

CD19/CD22 Dual Target Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Treat Human B-cell Malignancies

Inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target two B cell surface antigens, CD19 and CD22, improving treatment of B-cell malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). NCI is actively seeking parties interested in licensing this invention to commercialist the bicistronic CAR construct targeting CD19 and CD22 for immunotherapy.

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1

The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

Chimeric Adaptor Proteins (CAPs) Containing a Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) and a Kinase Domain for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapy

There remains a need for effective immunotherapies to treat solid tumors as well as hematological malignancies. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have designed novel chimeric adaptor proteins (CAPs) consisting of signaling molecules downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) for use in T cell-mediated immunotherapy. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing CAPs that can be used in immunotherapy for treating cancer, including both hematological and solid malignancies.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors that Recognize Mesothelin for Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the NCI have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) with a high affinity for mesothelin to be used as an immunotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and mesothelioma. Cells that express CARs, most notably T cells, are highly reactive against their specific tumor antigen in an MHC-unrestricted manner to generate an immune response that promotes robust tumor cell elimination when infused into cancer patients.

Combination Cancer Therapy with HDAC Inhibitors

NCI researchers developed a combination therapy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and immunotherapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, virus-based vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, cell-based treatments or radiopharmaceuticals. The NCI Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology seeks parties to license or co-develop this method.

Combination Therapy for Prostate and Breast Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute developed a novel method of immunogenic modulation in androgen and endocrine deprivation therapy. A combination of hormone therapy with immunotherapies such as PROSTVAC™, a Brachyury vaccine, PROVENGE™, ipilumimab, nivolumab, XOFIGO™, PANVAC, a yeast-MUC-1 immunotherapeutic, or HERCEPTIN™ can benefit prostate and breast cancer patients, especially those who have acquired resistances. The researchers seek parties to co-develop this method.

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