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Overexpression of Phf19 on T Cells Enhances Therapeutic Effects of T Cell-Based Therapies (such as Chimeric Antigen Receptor [CAR] Therapies)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to epigenetically reprogram CD8+ T cell fate by expressing elevated levels of the polycomb-like protein, Phf19. This technology is useful for improving T cell-based immunotherapies (such as CAR therapies) to treat a range of infectious diseases and cancers. NCI seeks licensing or co-development partners for this invention.

Peptide Hydrogels for Rate-Controlled Delivery of Therapeutics

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel delivery platform in which the scaffold of an anionic hydrogel (AcVES3) can be attenuated to deliver therapeutic small molecules, peptides, proteins, nanoparticles, or whole cells. The NCI seeks collaborators and licensees for the development of this technology in various clinical and laboratory applications.

Peptide Inhibitors for Viral Infections and as Anti-inflammatory Agents

IFN-gamma and IL-10 are cytokine signaling molecules that play fundamental roles in inflammation, cancer growth and autoimmune diseases.  Unfortunately, there are no specific inhibitors of IFN-gamma or IL-10 on the market to date. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop selective IL-10 and IFN-gamma peptide inhibitors.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). The compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain (“Plk1 PBD Portfolio”)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). These compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Phosphodiesterase as a target for cancer therapeutics

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute have discovered fluoroquinolone derivatives as specific Tdp1 inhibitors that could potentiate the pharmacological action of Top1 inhibitors currently used in cancer treatment.

Platform to Enhance Anti-Tumor Immunity

There is a marked increase in immunosuppressive myeloid progenitors and myeloid cells in tumors and at metastatic tissue sites, rendering these types of cells useful in cancer therapeutics, especially after genetic modifications that improve their anti-tumor properties further. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development or licensing partners to further develop genetically engineered myeloid cells (GEMys) for use in cancer immunotherapy.

Polymeric Delivery Platform for Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a polymeric drug delivery platform that targets scavenger receptor A1 (SR-A1), a receptor highly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells (myeloid lineages), and endothelial cells. The platform delivers various immunomodulatory therapeutic cargo including small molecule drugs, therapeutic peptides, and vaccines, to the lymphatic system and myeloid/antigen presenting cell (APC) sub-populations.

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

Potassium Hydroxy Citrate Promotes Longevity and Efficacy of Anti-Tumor T cells for Adoptive Cell Therapy (ACT)

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using tumor-specific T cells leads to complete tumor regression in some cancer patients. However, limiting the efficacy of this therapy is that T cells become functionally exhausted and have short half-lives after adoptive transfer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a novel method to generate long-lived memory tumor-specific T cells with enhanced tumor clearance and persistence upon in vivo transfer. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing potassium hydroxy citrate to promote longevity and efficacy of tumor-specific T cells.

Processes for Producing and Purifying Nucleic Acid-Containing Compositions

This technology provides improved processes for production and purification of nucleic acid-containing compositions, such as non-naturally occurring viruses, for example, recombinant polioviruses that can be employed as oncolytic agents. Some of the improved processes relate to improved processes for producing viral DNA template.

Rapid Manufacture of Retroviral Vectors Encoding Tumor-Specific T Cell Receptors for Adoptive Cell Immunotherapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method enabling rapid, GMP-compliant manufacture of retroviral vectors encoding anti-tumor T cell receptors (TCRs). T cells engineered through the use of these vectors to express tumor-reactive TCRs will be useful in adoptive cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival

The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

Renal Selective Unsaturated Englerin Analogues

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a number of analogs of the natural product englerin A, an inhibitor of renal cancer cell growth. Englerin A is thought to exert its anticancer effects by activating protein kinase C (PKC) theta, and exert cytotoxic effects through activation of transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels. The invention englerin analogues provide promising treatment strategies for various cancers, diabetes, and HIV, and other diseases associated with the PKC theta and/or TRPC ion channel proteins. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for englerin A analogue compounds.

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