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Methods of Producing Thymic Emigrants from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of T cells for a variety of clinical applications. However, current in vitro methods of T cell differentiation result in the generation of cells with aberrant phenotypes. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have now developed methodology for generating induced pluripotent stem cell thymic emigrants (iTE). Antigen-specific CD8αβ+ iTEs exhibited functional properties in vitro that were almost indistinguishable from natural naïve CD8αβ+ T cells, including vigorous expansion and robust anti-tumor activity. iTEs recapitulated many of the transcriptional programs of naïve T cells in vivo and revealed a striking capacity for engraftment, memory formation, and efficient tumor destruction. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Synthetic Lethality-mediated Precision Oncology via the Tumor Transcriptome

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed SELECT (synthetic lethality and rescue-mediated precision oncology via the transcriptome), a computational precision-oncology framework harnessing genetic interactions to improve treatment options for cancer patients. NCI seeks collaborators or licensees to advance the development of this technology into precision diagnostics.

Detection of Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Water Supplies

Testing for biological activity of glucocorticoids and many other steroid endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has not been previously performed. An automated, highly reproducible, and low cost assay detects biologically active steroidal EDCs and is suitable for wide application in testing water samples. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative co-development research and/or licensing to move this technology into the public domain.

Fully-human Heavy-chain-only Anti-B-cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs)

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapies that specifically target B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) are strong therapeutic candidates for patients with plasma cell malignancy diseases such as, multiple myeloma (MM), as well as for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. BCMA is a cell surface protein preferentially expressed on a subset of B cells and mature plasma cells, but not on other cells in the body. The limited expression of BCMA on B and plasma cells makes BCMA an attractive therapeutic target for B cell and plasma cell malignancy diseases. The 12 anti-BCMA CARs described are fully human CARS and have the potential to treat patients with various plasma cell and B cell malignancy diseases.

Therapeutic Immunotoxins with Increased Half-Life and Anti-Tumor Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for mesothelin targeting Recombinant Immunotoxins (RITs). These RITs have been engineered by site specific modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to have an increased serum half-life, while maintaining high cytotoxicity and have greatly improved anti-tumor activity.

A Novel Transgenic Zebrafish Line Reporting Dynamic Epigenetic Changes

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) seeks licensees for a novel “EpiTag” epigenetic reporter transgenic zebrafish line that provides a versatile and powerful whole-animal platform for visualizing and assessing the effects of mutants, experimental treatments, or chemical compounds targeting epigenetic regulation as well as studying epigenetic regulation of global- or tissue-specific gene expression during development.

SMAD3 Reporter Mouse for Assessing TGF-ß/Activin Pathway Activation

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel mouse for the detection of TGF-ß signaling. This mouse provides the opportunity to study TGF-ß signaling in vivo and may be a useful model for preclinical pharmacology studies. The NCI seeks licensees for the TGF-ß reporter mouse.

Aryl Hydantoin Heterocycle Compounds that Target the Androgen Receptor for Prostate Cancer Treatment

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed aryl hydantoin heterocycles that target the androgen receptor (AR). NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees to develop these compounds as therapeutics for prostate cancer. As these compounds consist of both AR agonists and antagonists, they may also be effective therapeutics for androgen dysfunctional disorders, such as androgen deficiency disorders or hyperandrogenism.

Reporter Plasmid to Identify Cancer Stem Cells

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics seeks partners to co-develop lentiviral plasmids, a research tool for visualizing and purifying cancer stem cells.

Module to Freeze and Store Frozen Tissue

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an engineered storage unit for frozen tissue, that provides a permanent base on which to mount tissue frozen in OCT and an enclosure for storage. The unit provides for chain-of-custody labeling and acts as an insulating container to protect the specimen. Other elements include devices for freezing the tissue to the base, as well as a holder for the base to facilitate cryosectioning. Application of the storage system allows a frozen tissue specimen to be moved between storage and cryosectioning without loss of label, deformation of tissue, or thermal alterations.

Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4) Monoclonal Antibodies and Methods of Their Use

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed several high-affinity monoclonal antibodies to treat Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4)-related diseases including rhabdomyosarcoma and cancers of the liver, lung, pancreas, ovary and prostate. These antibodies have been used to generate antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), which are capable of specifically targeting and killing diseased cells. NCI seeks co-development opportunities or licensees for this technology.

Methods of preventing tissue ischemia

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Pathology seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop therapeutics targeting vasodialation.

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

Device for Growing Mammalian Cells on EM Grids

A device used to hold transmission electron microscopy grids that allows adherent mammalian cells to grow on and the 3D printing software to create the device, which the NCI seeks to license.

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