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CytoSig: A Software Platform for Predicting Cytokine Signaling Activities, Target Discovery, and Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) from Transcriptomic Profiles

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed the Cytokine Signaling Analyzer (CytoSig), a software-based platform that provides both a database of target genes modulated by cytokines and a predictive model of cytokine signaling cascades from transcriptomic profiles. NCI seeks collaborators or licensees to advance the development of CytoSig for research, target discovery, or as a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS).

A Rapid Method of Isolating Neoantigen-specific T Cell Receptor Sequences

Recent research has demonstrated that neoantigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) can be isolated from a cancer patient’s lymphocytes. These TCRs may be used to engineer populations of tumor-reactive T cells for cancer immunotherapies. Obtaining sequences of these functional TCRs is a critical initial step in preparing this type of personalized cancer treatment; however, current methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a rapid and robust method of isolating the sequences of mutation-specific TCRs to alleviate these issues; they seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the development of a method for isolating the sequences of tumor-reactive TCRs. For collaboration opportunities, please contact Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D. at sar@nih.gov.

Assay to Screen Anti-metastatic Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for a model used to study molecular mechanisms and/or signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer and its response to therapy.

A New Class of Stable Heptamethine Cyanine Fluorophores and Biomedical Applications Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an improved class of heptamethine cyanine fluorophore dyes useful for imaging applications in the near-IR range (750-850 nm). A new chemical reaction has been developed that provides easy access to novel molecules with improved properties. Specifically, the dyes display greater resistance to thiol nucleophiles, and are more robust while maintaining excellent optical properties. The dyes have been successfully employed in various in vivo imaging applications and in vitro labeling and microscopy applications. The NCI seek co-development or licensees to develop them as targetable agents for optical-guided surgical interventions.

Reporter Plasmid to Identify Cancer Stem Cells

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics seeks partners to co-develop lentiviral plasmids, a research tool for visualizing and purifying cancer stem cells.

Niclosamide for Treating Adrenocortical Cancer (ACC)

Researchers at the NCI have developed a novel treatment for adrenocortical cancer (ACC) by repositioning the drug niclosamide. New treatments for ACC can help patients with this rare and aggressive disease, where the current standard of care involves highly toxic options. The NCI seeks parties to license this method of treating adrenocortical cancer using niclosamide.

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

Metastatic ovarian cancer mouse models and cell lines for preclinical studies

NCI's Center for Advanced Preclinical Research (CAPR) has developed a Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (SEOC) genetically engineered mouse model (GEM), GEM-derived SEOC orthotopic mouse model, and biological materials derived therefrom, with several key histopathologic, immunophenotypical, and genetic features of human SEOC. NCI CAPR seeks licensees for this technology.

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

Target for Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

The Surgery Branch of the National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to carry out genotypic as well as phenotypic analysis of the 888 mel cell line in order to better understand the nature of tumor cells that respond to therapy.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

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