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A Rapid Method of Isolating Neoantigen-specific T Cell Receptor Sequences

Recent research has demonstrated that neoantigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) can be isolated from a cancer patient’s lymphocytes. These TCRs may be used to engineer populations of tumor-reactive T cells for cancer immunotherapies. Obtaining sequences of these functional TCRs is a critical initial step in preparing this type of personalized cancer treatment; however, current methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a rapid and robust method of isolating the sequences of mutation-specific TCRs to alleviate these issues; they seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the development of a method for isolating the sequences of tumor-reactive TCRs. For collaboration opportunities, please contact Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D. at sar@nih.gov.

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

CytoSig: A Software Platform for Predicting Cytokine Signaling Activities, Target Discovery, and Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) from Transcriptomic Profiles

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed the Cytokine Signaling Analyzer (CytoSig), a software-based platform that provides both a database of target genes modulated by cytokines and a predictive model of cytokine signaling cascades from transcriptomic profiles. NCI seeks collaborators or licensees to advance the development of CytoSig for research, target discovery, or as a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS).

BODIPY-FL Nilotinib (Tasigna) for Use in Cancer Research

The National Cancer Institute''s Laboratory of Cell Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize bodipy conjugated tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic for the treatment of CML or gastric cancers.

SMAD3 Reporter Mouse for Assessing TGF-ß/Activin Pathway Activation

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel mouse for the detection of TGF-ß signaling. This mouse provides the opportunity to study TGF-ß signaling in vivo and may be a useful model for preclinical pharmacology studies. The NCI seeks licensees for the TGF-ß reporter mouse.

Reporter Plasmid to Identify Cancer Stem Cells

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics seeks partners to co-develop lentiviral plasmids, a research tool for visualizing and purifying cancer stem cells.

Genetically Engineered Mouse-Derived Allograft for Preclinical Studies of Metastatic Melanoma

Researchers at NCI have developed a means of more closely simulating in mouse models both melanoma cancer itself and the resulting physiological an immunological response by creating a genetically engineered mice (GEM)-derived allograft (GDA).  This allograft both resembles human-like melanoma and has features that will stimulate a normal immunological response in the mouse.

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

A549 Cells: Lung Carcinoma Cell Line for Adenovirus

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute have developed a cell line designated A549 that was derived from explanted cultures of human lung cancer tissue. The A549 cell line has been tested under the guidance of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) so, under current Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), these cells may be suitable for use in manufacturing constructs for use in clinical trials. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties to non-exclusively license this research material.

Device for Growing Mammalian Cells on EM Grids

A device used to hold transmission electron microscopy grids that allows adherent mammalian cells to grow on and the 3D printing software to create the device, which the NCI seeks to license.

Device to guide oxygen over cells for photo-oxidation

Device is used to guide a stream of oxygen or carbon dioxide over a dish of cells during fluorescence microscopy. Invention includes the 3D printing software to create the device. The device makes it possible to easily provide a steady source of oxygen or carbon dioxide to cells while operating a fluorescent microscope to oxidize fluorophores for later visualization in electron microscopy. NCI seeks commercial partners to license this technology.

A New Class of Stable Heptamethine Cyanine Fluorophores and Biomedical Applications Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an improved class of heptamethine cyanine fluorophore dyes useful for imaging applications in the near-IR range (750-850 nm). A new chemical reaction has been developed that provides easy access to novel molecules with improved properties. Specifically, the dyes display greater resistance to thiol nucleophiles, and are more robust while maintaining excellent optical properties. The dyes have been successfully employed in various in vivo imaging applications and in vitro labeling and microscopy applications. The NCI seek co-development or licensees to develop them as targetable agents for optical-guided surgical interventions.

Development and Characterization of the SLC46A3 Knockout Mouse Line

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for an SLC46A3 knockout mouse line. SLC46A3 is a solute carrier of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and is thought to have roles in multiple diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, liver cancer and obesity.

Bioluminescent Bladder Cancer Cell Line for Tracking Cancer Progression

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a bioluminescent MB49-luciferase bladder cancer cell line that can be used in preclinical studies to evaluate anti-cancer agents in bladder cancer. NCI seeks parties to non-exclusively license this research material.

AT-3 Mouse Breast Tumor Cell Line

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for the AT-3 mouse breast tumor cell line derived from an autochthonous tumor model.

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