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HIV-1 IN Mutant in a Single Round Vector

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks potential non-exclusive licensees for a collection of mutated single-round vectors for testing of potential Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor (INSTI) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor drugs.

A Murine Model of Inflammation Based on Chronic Expression of Interferon-Gamma

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has a novel mouse model of autoimmunity based on chronic interferon-gamma expression (ARE-Del). This mouse can be used as an in vivo model to study female-biased autoimmune diseases, including: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Primary Biliary Cholangitis, and Ovarian Failure Syndrome.

AT-3 Mouse Breast Tumor Cell Line

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for the AT-3 mouse breast tumor cell line derived from an autochthonous tumor model.

Polymer-Cast Inserts for Cell Histology and Microscopy

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks co-development partners and/or licensees for polymer-cast inserts for cell histology and microscopy; a system for high throughput three-dimensional (3D) cell culture and screening microscopy.

Development and Characterization of the SLC46A3 Knockout Mouse Line

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for an SLC46A3 knockout mouse line. SLC46A3 is a solute carrier of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and is thought to have roles in multiple diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, liver cancer and obesity.

Human Synovial Sarcoma Cell Line A2243

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks parties interested in licensing a human synovial sarcoma cell line (A2243). This cell line is an excellent research tool to study synovial sarcoma with a focus on chromosome translocations.

A Novel Genetically Encoded Inhibitor of Hippo Signaling Pathway to Study YAP1/TAZ-TEAD Dependent Events in Cancer

The Hippo signaling pathway is one of the most frequently altered pathways in human cancer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a genetically encoded peptide inhibitor of the Hippo signaling pathway members YAP1/TAZ-TEAD, to dissect and study the specific TEAD-downstream regulatory gene expression networks of cell proliferation, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell functions in different cell types and pathologies. The DNA construct encoding this inhibitor may be delivered to cells using lentivirus, adenovirus, or adeno-associated virus, and is a valuable research tool. NCI seeks licensees for this peptide inhibitor and the encoding DNA construct.

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

Target for Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

The Surgery Branch of the National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to carry out genotypic as well as phenotypic analysis of the 888 mel cell line in order to better understand the nature of tumor cells that respond to therapy.

Metastatic ovarian cancer mouse models and cell lines for preclinical studies

NCI's Center for Advanced Preclinical Research (CAPR) has developed a Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (SEOC) genetically engineered mouse model (GEM), GEM-derived SEOC orthotopic mouse model, and biological materials derived therefrom, with several key histopathologic, immunophenotypical, and genetic features of human SEOC. NCI CAPR seeks licensees for this technology.

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

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