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Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma

The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

Genetically Engineered Mouse-Derived Allograft for Preclinical Studies of Metastatic Melanoma

Researchers at NCI have developed a means of more closely simulating in mouse models both melanoma cancer itself and the resulting physiological an immunological response by creating a genetically engineered mice (GEM)-derived allograft (GDA).  This allograft both resembles human-like melanoma and has features that will stimulate a normal immunological response in the mouse.

Optical Microscope Software for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Researchers from NCI and Rudgers University developed  methods of detecting abnormal cells in a sample using the spatial position of one or more genes within the nucleus of a cell, as well as a kit for detecting abnormal cells using such methods. The invention also provides methods of identifying gene markers for abnormal cells using the spatial position of one or more genes within the nucleus of a cell. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop diagnostic methods for detection of cancer using spatial genome organization.

Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1

The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

A New Class of Stable Heptamethine Cyanine Fluorophores and Biomedical Applications Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an improved class of heptamethine cyanine fluorophore dyes useful for imaging applications in the near-IR range (750-850 nm). A new chemical reaction has been developed that provides easy access to novel molecules with improved properties. Specifically, the dyes display greater resistance to thiol nucleophiles, and are more robust while maintaining excellent optical properties. The dyes have been successfully employed in various in vivo imaging applications and in vitro labeling and microscopy applications. The NCI seek co-development or licensees to develop them as targetable agents for optical-guided surgical interventions.

Knockout and Conditional Knockout Mice-GPR116

Pulmonary surfactant plays a critical role in preventing alveolar collapse by decreasing surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface. Surfactant deficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), common disorders that can afflict patients of all ages and carry a mortality rate greater than 25%. Excess surfactant leads to pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. NCI investigators created a G-protein coupled receptor GPR116 mutant mouse model and showed that GPR116 plays a previously unexpected, essential role in maintaining normal surfactant levels in the lung. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in collaborative research to license surfactant modulating agents for the treatment of surfactant related lung disorders.

Novel Fusion Proteins for HIV Vaccine

The National Cancer Institute’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties to license gp120 and CD4-induced antibody fusion proteins for use in an HIV vaccine.

Murine metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed orthotopic allograft models for pancreatic cancer that utilize cells or tumor fragments implanted into the cancer-free pancreata of recipient immunocompetent mice. NCI seeks licensees to commercialize this invention.

Device for Growing Mammalian Cells on EM Grids

A device used to hold transmission electron microscopy grids that allows adherent mammalian cells to grow on and the 3D printing software to create the device, which the NCI seeks to license.

Bioluminescent Bladder Cancer Cell Line for Tracking Cancer Progression

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a bioluminescent MB49-luciferase bladder cancer cell line that can be used in preclinical studies to evaluate anti-cancer agents in bladder cancer. NCI seeks parties to non-exclusively license this research material.

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

Non-invasive Methods for Characterizing Adrenocortical Tumors

Researchers at the NCI developed a non-invasive method for distinguishing benign from malignant adrenocortical tumors using urine samples. The NCI seeks parties to co-develop a non-invasive, diagnostic method of distinguishing between benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors through the analysis of metabolites using urine samples.

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