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Showing 21-40 of 63 results found

Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1

The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

Device for Growing Mammalian Cells on EM Grids

A device used to hold transmission electron microscopy grids that allows adherent mammalian cells to grow on and the 3D printing software to create the device, which the NCI seeks to license.

BODIPY-FL Nilotinib (Tasigna) for Use in Cancer Research

The National Cancer Institute''s Laboratory of Cell Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize bodipy conjugated tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic for the treatment of CML or gastric cancers.

High-throughput Assay to Identify New Cancer Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to evaluate or commercialize a diagnostic tool that can identify new drugs that increase chromosome instability.

Assay to Screen Anti-metastatic Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for a model used to study molecular mechanisms and/or signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer and its response to therapy.

Establishment of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) from the Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel

Hibernation in mammals is a seasonal state of metabolic suppression and dormancy characterized by a decrease in body temperature to survive extreme environmental stresses. A new Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) line has been established from the neural precursor cells of wild type thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), a small mammalian hibernator with unique metabolic adaptations for coping with cold and restricted food supply. This ground squirrel iPSC line can be differentiated into many different cell types for hibernation studies, disease modeling, and drug screening for neuronal injuries or other diseases.

Niclosamide for Treating Adrenocortical Cancer (ACC)

Researchers at the NCI have developed a novel treatment for adrenocortical cancer (ACC) by repositioning the drug niclosamide. New treatments for ACC can help patients with this rare and aggressive disease, where the current standard of care involves highly toxic options. The NCI seeks parties to license this method of treating adrenocortical cancer using niclosamide.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

Zirconium-89 PET Imaging Agent for Cancer

This technology is a new generation of rationally designed chelating agents that improve the complexation of Zirconium-89 for PET imaging of cancers.

Genetically Engineered Mouse-Derived Allograft for Preclinical Studies of Metastatic Melanoma

Researchers at NCI have developed a means of more closely simulating in mouse models both melanoma cancer itself and the resulting physiological an immunological response by creating a genetically engineered mice (GEM)-derived allograft (GDA).  This allograft both resembles human-like melanoma and has features that will stimulate a normal immunological response in the mouse.

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