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3D Image Rendering Softwarefor Biological Tissues

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop software for the automatic 3-D visualization of biological image volumes.

A Gene-Based Prognostic for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patient Response to Adjuvant Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

The gold standard of care for hepatocellular carcinoma patients with intermediate- to locally advanced tumors is transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), a procedure whereby the tumor is targeted both with local chemotherapy and restriction of local blood supply. NCI scientists have identified a 14-gene signature predictive of response to TACE, and NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners to develop the technology toward commercialization.

A Rabbit Anti-pT1989 ATR Monoclonal Antibody for Use in Immunoassays

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a monoclonal antibody against ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase phosphorylated at threonine 1989. The antibody can be used for pharmacodynamic assays to quantify drug action on the ATR target.

Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

Anti-Py1235-Met Immunological Binding Reagent as Cancer Diagnostic

This technology consists of highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies reactive with phosphorylated tyrosine located at amino acid 1235 in the human MET sequence. Binding to this pYl235 residue is independent of the phosphorylation of other tyrosines in the vicinity (1230 and 1234), does not cross-react with these nearby phosphotyrosine residues, and does not occur when Y1235 is unphosphorylated. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations  to commercialize and develop a companion diagnostic for selective MET inhibitors.

Assay for Arf GTP-binding Proteins

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize an antibody-based proteomics assay.

Assays for Measuring and Quantifying DNA Damage

The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of assays for determining the levels of gamma-H2AX/H2AX to measure and quantify DNA damage.

Biomarker signature development: microRNAs for biodosimetry

Alterations in microRNAs (miRNAs), a type of small non-coding RNAs, have been reported in cells/tumors subjected to radiation exposure, implying that miRNAs play an important role in cellular stress response to radiation. NCI researchers evaluated small non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), and mRNA, as potential non-invasive biomarkers for radiation biodosimetry. The NCI Radiation Oncology Branch seeks parties interested in licensing or co-development of RNA biomarker signature(s) for radiation biodosimetry.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors that Recognize Mesothelin for Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the NCI have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) with a high affinity for mesothelin to be used as an immunotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and mesothelioma. Cells that express CARs, most notably T cells, are highly reactive against their specific tumor antigen in an MHC-unrestricted manner to generate an immune response that promotes robust tumor cell elimination when infused into cancer patients.

Clinical Imaging with Acoustic Wave or Photoacoustic Tomosynthesis

Ultrasound-based cancer screening and biopsy imaging technique are a critical clinical need. Ultrasound based biopsy imaging can provide a real-time modality for lower cost that is comparable to, or complimentary to MRI imaging. Researchers at the NIH Clinical Center seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for Tissue Characterization with Acoustic Wave Tomosynthesis.

Clinical Outcome Predictors for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

The invention is a novel methodology for predicting a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cancer patient’s survival prognosis. This information is important in helping determine the best course of treatment for the patient.

Computer-Aided Diagnostic for Use in Multiparametric MRI for Prostate Cancer

Researchers at the National Institutes for Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed computer-aided diagnostics (CAD) that may further improve the already superior capabilities of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and imaging of prostate cancer. This system produces an accurate probability map of potential cancerous lesions in multiparametric MRI images that is superior to other systems and may have multiple product applications.

Detection of Colorectal Cancer with Two Novel Heme-Related Molecules in Human Feces

Mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC) can be reduced by detecting the cancer or its precursor, colorectal adenoma (CRA), so that it can be removed at an early stage.  Current tests involve screening stool specimens for blood, especially for hemoglobin.  The fecal immunochemical test (FIT) for hemoglobin is positive in stool for only about 60% of early-stage and 85% of advanced CRC cases, with a false-positive rate of less than 10%.  Researchers at the NCI have developed an assay with better accuracy and seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the commercialization of the assay.

Detection of Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Water Supplies

Testing for biological activity of glucocorticoids and many other steroid endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has not been previously performed. An automated, highly reproducible, and low cost assay detects biologically active steroidal EDCs and is suitable for wide application in testing water samples. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative co-development research and/or licensing to move this technology into the public domain.

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