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Fully-human Heavy-chain-only Anti-B-cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs)

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapies that specifically target B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) are strong therapeutic candidates for patients with plasma cell malignancy diseases such as, multiple myeloma (MM), as well as for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. BCMA is a cell surface protein preferentially expressed on a subset of B cells and mature plasma cells, but not on other cells in the body. The limited expression of BCMA on B and plasma cells makes BCMA an attractive therapeutic target for B cell and plasma cell malignancy diseases. The 12 anti-BCMA CARs described are fully human CARS and have the potential to treat patients with various plasma cell and B cell malignancy diseases.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

High Affinity Cross Species Single Domain Antibodies Targeting Mesothelin

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two high affinity anti-mesothelin single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies), A101 and G8. These antibodies have been isolated from NCI’s newly developed camel single domain (VHH) libraries by phage display. The antibodies have a high affinity for mesothelin-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-1

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two Glypican-1- (GPC1)- specific antibodies: the mouse monoclonal antibody HM2 that binds the C-lobe of GPC1 close to the cell surface, and the camel single domain antibody D4. The D4 single domain antibody (also called ‘nanobody’) has a high affinity for GPC1-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 for Treating Childhood Cancers

Cancer therapies that specifically target Glypican 2 (GPC2) are strong therapeutic candidates for pediatric patients with neuroblastoma and other GPC2 expressing cancers. The inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed and isolated two new antibodies that target GPC2 (CT3 and CT5) that are available for licensing and co-development.

Highly Soluble Pyrimido-Dione-Quinoline Compounds: Small Molecules that Stabilize and Activate p53 in Transformed Cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention reporting the composition and function of a pyrimido-dione-quinoline that was found to inhibit HDM2’s ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity without accompanying genotoxicity. The current invention results in the stabilization of p53 in cells through the inhibition of its ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation resulting in a robust p53 response in tumors. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

Human T Cell Receptors for Treating Cancer

T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins that recognize antigens in the context of infected or transformed cells and activate T cells to mediate an immune response and destroy abnormal cells. The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch seeks interested parties to license or co-develop the use of T cell receptors (TCRs) cloned against the SSX-2 antigen for the treatment of cancer.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

Immunogenic Antigen Selective Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging working on cancer immunotherapy and detection report the use of SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer. Specific human malignancies targeted for the treatments disclosed include melanoma and lung, colon, renal, ovarian and breast carcinomas. The NIA seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer.

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