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Showing 21-40 of 103 results found

Combination Cancer Therapy with HDAC Inhibitors

NCI researchers developed a combination therapy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and immunotherapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, virus-based vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, cell-based treatments or radiopharmaceuticals. The NCI Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology seeks parties to license or co-develop this method.

Use of Cucurbitacins and Withanolides for the Treatment of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer Inflammation Program, seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of certain cucurbatacins or withanolides in combination with pro-apoptotic agonists of TRAIL death receptors for cancer therapy.

Agonistic Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Death Receptor 4 (DR4)

The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in licensing human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4 ("DR4"). The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its functional receptors, DR4 and DR5, have been recognized as promising targets for cancer treatment.

Use of Heterodimeric IL-15 in Adoptive Cell Transfer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a technology that provides methods of performing adoptive cell transfer (ACT), an immunotherapeutic approach for cancer treatment, by administering a heterodimeric Interleukin 15/Interleukin 15 receptor alpha (IL-15/IL-15Rα) complex (hetlL-15) in the absence of lymphodepletion, thereby eliminating any lymphodepletion-associated detrimental side effects.

Methods of Making Extracellular Vesicles and of Reducing Their Uptake by the Liver

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed scalable cGMP-compatible technologies to obtain highly purified engineered extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic delivery. The NCI invention 1) includes novel forms of the immunotherapeutic agent heterodimeric, interleukin-15 (hetIL-15) designed to therapeutically enhance EV and 2) provides methods of reducing liver uptake of EVs, thereby increasing delivery to target sites, such as tumors.

Brachyury-directed Vaccine for the Prevention or Treatment of Cancers

Researchers at the NCI have developed a vaccine technology that stimulates the immune system to selectively destroy metastasizing cells. Stimulation of T cells with the Brachyury peptide promote a robust immune response and lead to targeted lysis of invasive tumor cells. NCI seeks licensing or co-development of this invention.

Angiogenesis-Based Cancer Therapeutic

The National Cancer Institute's Urologic Oncology Branch seeks interested parties to co-develop antagonists to VEGF-A and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) that block signal transduction and associated cellular responses.

Human T Cell Receptors for Treating Cancer

T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins that recognize antigens in the context of infected or transformed cells and activate T cells to mediate an immune response and destroy abnormal cells. The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch seeks interested parties to license or co-develop the use of T cell receptors (TCRs) cloned against the SSX-2 antigen for the treatment of cancer.

Cancer-reactive T cells from Peripheral Blood

T-cells capable of reacting to mutations in cancer patients have potential use as therapeutics. Identifying and isolating these cells from patients is a crucial step in developing these treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from a patient’s peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The NCI, Surgery Branch, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize this method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from peripheral blood.

Treatment Regimens for hetIL-15

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a treatment regimens for cancer and HIV using heterodimeric IL-15 (hetIL-15). The regimens allow access to B cell follicles, germinal centers, and tumor sites that are difficult for drug entry. A combination therapy for HIV infection is also described using hetIL-15 and a conserved element vaccine. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development and commercialization of treatment regimens for HIV infection.

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

Novel Murine T-Cell Receptors for Treating Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

Metastatic thyroid cancer can be resistant to current treatment options such as radioactive iodine therapy. Targeting thyroglobulin, a thyroid-specific antigen, as part of an adoptive cell therapy approach will allow for new therapeutic possibilities. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel T-cell receptors for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer.

Inhibition of T Cell Differentiation and Senescence by Overexpression of Transcription Factor c-Myb

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method by which memory T cells can be generated from other T cell populations using overexpression of the transcription factor c-Myb. Importantly, these reprogrammed memory T cells show increased proliferative and survival capacity. This strategy could also potentially generate anti-tumor T cells with improved viability and therapeutic efficacy for adoptive ACT. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

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