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Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are engineered proteins that can be used in a therapeutic capacity when expressed by an immune cell (e.g., a T cell). Specifically, CARs comprise a targeting domain (such as an antibody or binding fragment thereof) as well as domains that activate immune cells. By selecting a targeting domain that binds to a protein that is selectively expressed on a cancer cell, it is possible to target immune cells to the cancer cells. Upon binding to the target cell, the immune cells are activated, leading to the destruction of the cancer cell. This therapeutic approach holds great promise, as evidenced by the recent FDA-approval of CAR-T cell therapies, KYMRIAH and YESCARTA, both of which target CD19.

Cancer Therapeutic based on Stimulation of Natural Killer T-cell Anti-tumor Activity

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute''s Vaccine Branch have found that beta-mannosylceramide (Beta-ManCer) promotes immunity in an IFN-gamma independent mechanism and seek statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize beta-ManCer.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors for the treatment of leukemia and other cancers.

A tumor-associated antigen Fms-Related Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3 ) is known to be expressed on the cell surface of a majority of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML).  NCI researchers have developed CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from a FLT3 targeting antibody.  The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for ALL or AML and other tumors which express FLT3. The NCI seeks licensees and/or co-development partners to commercialize this technology.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 for Treating Childhood Cancers

Cancer therapies that specifically target Glypican 2 (GPC2) are strong therapeutic candidates for pediatric patients with neuroblastoma and other GPC2 expressing cancers. The inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed and isolated two new antibodies that target GPC2 (CT3 and CT5) that are available for licensing and co-development.

Highly Soluble Pyrimido-Dione-Quinoline Compounds: Small Molecules that Stabilize and Activate p53 in Transformed Cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention reporting the composition and function of a pyrimido-dione-quinoline that was found to inhibit HDM2’s ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity without accompanying genotoxicity. The current invention results in the stabilization of p53 in cells through the inhibition of its ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation resulting in a robust p53 response in tumors. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

Immunogenic Antigen Selective Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging working on cancer immunotherapy and detection report the use of SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer. Specific human malignancies targeted for the treatments disclosed include melanoma and lung, colon, renal, ovarian and breast carcinomas. The NIA seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer.

Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

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