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Nanoparticle-hydrogel Composite for Nucleic Acid Molecule Delivery

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research a co-development partner and/or licensees for applications utilizing the nanoparticle platform technology for delivery of cancer-specific microRNAs, particularly for therapeutic uses in surface cancers, such as mesothelioma.

Immunogenic Antigen Selective Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging working on cancer immunotherapy and detection report the use of SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer. Specific human malignancies targeted for the treatments disclosed include melanoma and lung, colon, renal, ovarian and breast carcinomas. The NIA seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer.

Antibody and Immunotoxin Treatments for Mesothelin-expressing Cancers

The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize antibody-based treatments of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

Reprogrammed Tumor Infiltrated Lymphocytes for Efficient Identification of Tumor-Antigen Specific T-Cell Receptors

Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) has proven to effectively treat established tumors. This treatment consists of harvesting Tumor Infiltrated Lymphocytes (TIL) which specifically recognize cancer, expanding the tumor-specific TIL in vitro, and then reinfusing these cells into the patient for treatment. Both these lymphocytes and their T cell receptors (TCR) are valuable for cancer immunotherapy. Inventors from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an improved method to identify tumor-specific TCRs by reprogramming TIL into stem cells. This invention is available to license further development.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). The compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Potassium Hydroxy Citrate Promotes Longevity and Efficacy of Anti-Tumor T cells for Adoptive Cell Therapy (ACT)

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using tumor-specific T cells leads to complete tumor regression in some cancer patients. However, limiting the efficacy of this therapy is that T cells become functionally exhausted and have short half-lives after adoptive transfer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a novel method to generate long-lived memory tumor-specific T cells with enhanced tumor clearance and persistence upon in vivo transfer. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing potassium hydroxy citrate to promote longevity and efficacy of tumor-specific T cells.

PIM-Targeted PROTACs

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a series of PIM Kinase targeting PROTACS.

Polymeric Delivery Platform for Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a polymeric drug delivery platform that targets scavenger receptor A1 (SR-A1), a receptor highly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells (myeloid lineages), and endothelial cells. The platform delivers various immunomodulatory therapeutic cargo including small molecule drugs, therapeutic peptides, and vaccines, to the lymphatic system and myeloid/antigen presenting cell (APC) sub-populations.

Synthetic Bacterial Nanoparticles as Drug and Vaccine Delivery Vehicles

Engineered bacterial spores can provide many useful functions such as the treatment of infections, use as an adjuvant for the delivery of vaccines, and the enzymatic degradation of environmental pollutants. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology have developed a novel, synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayer (SSHEL) particle that is uniquely suited for a variety of these functions. NCI seeks partners to license and/or co-develop this technology toward commercialization.

T cell Receptors Which Recognize Mutated EGFR

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated T cell receptors (TCRs) that target specific mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The mutated protein recognized by these TCRs is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic applications, including engineered adoptive cell immunotherapy. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel T cell receptors that recognize EGFR mutations.

Novel Regulatory B cells for Treatment of Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

Cancer cells have been found to directly activate resting B cells to form suppressive regulatory B cells (tBregs) and utilize them to evade immune surveillance and mediate metastasis. tBregs directly inhibit CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activity in a cell contact-dependent manner, induce FoxP3+ T cell activity, and promote Treg-dependent metastasis. The National Institute on Aging's Immunotherapeutics Unit, is seeking parties interested in licensing or co-development of regulatory B cells to control autoimmune diseases and strategies that inactivate tBregs to control cancer immune escape. 

Method of Neoantigen-Reactive T Cell Receptor (TCR) Isolation from Peripheral Blood of Cancer Patients

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a novel method for isolation and construction of neoantigen-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of cancer patients. This method generates accurate scoring of single T cells from tumors, as well as facilitates identification and reconstruction of unknown TCRs for immunotherapy.

EGFRvIII Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated seven monoclonal antibodies that bind to the human epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) but not wildtype EGFR. The NCI seeks research co-development partners or licensees for monoclonal antibodies that specifically target cancer-expressed EGFR.

CD206 Small Molecule Modulators, Their Use and Methods for Preparation

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a small molecule that binds to CD206 and activates M2-like tumor associated macrophages resulting in innate and adaptive anti-tumor responses. NCI seeks research co-development or licensees for CD206 small molecule modulators as a therapeutic for CD206-expressing cancers (such as pancreatic, sarcoma, head and neck, lung, gastric, triple negative breast, renal cell, colorectal cancer, melanoma).

Monoclonal Antibodies and Immunoconjugates Directed to the Non-ShedPortion (“Stalk”) of Mesothelin are Excellent Candidates for Developing Therapeutic Agents

Antibodies that specifically recognize and bind to the unshed portion (“stalk”) of human mesothelin are strong therapeutic candidates because they maintain contact with the cancer cell for a longer duration than other anti-mesothelin antibodies that are currently available. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed such antibodies that specifically recognize and bind to the stalk of human mesothelin with high affinity. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

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