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Coacervate Micoparticles Useful for the Sustained Release of Therapeutic Agents

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have discovered novel microparticles that are formed using a coacervation process; the biodegradable microbead or microparticle is useful for the sustained localized delivery of biologically active proteins or other molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The microparticles have a matrix structure comprised of the reaction product of at least one cationic polymer, at least one anionic polymer, and a binding component (e.g. gelatin, chondroitin sulfate, avidin).

Immunogenic Antigen Selective Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging working on cancer immunotherapy and detection report the use of SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer. Specific human malignancies targeted for the treatments disclosed include melanoma and lung, colon, renal, ovarian and breast carcinomas. The NIA seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer.

Novel Regulatory B cells for Treatment of Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

Cancer cells have been found to directly activate resting B cells to form suppressive regulatory B cells (tBregs) and utilize them to evade immune surveillance and mediate metastasis. tBregs directly inhibit CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activity in a cell contact-dependent manner, induce FoxP3+ T cell activity, and promote Treg-dependent metastasis. The National Institute on Aging's Immunotherapeutics Unit, is seeking parties interested in licensing or co-development of regulatory B cells to control autoimmune diseases and strategies that inactivate tBregs to control cancer immune escape. 

Therapeutics for Neurodegenerative Disorders and Cancer Using Lenalidomide Analogs

Novel thalidomide analogs and their use as immunomodulatory agents are disclosed in this invention by scientists at the National Institute on Aging (NIA). These therapeutic compounds could reduce chronic systemic and central nervous system inflammation. The NIA seeks licensing or co-development partners to commercialize this technology.

Transformation of Weak or Non-Immunogenic Antigens to Produce an Immune Response and Therapeutic Polypeptides for the Treatment and Prevention of Cancer

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have developed a novel strategy for rendering weakly or non-immunogenic, shared (between self and tumor) antigens immunogenic, or able to produce an immune response. Further, they have created therapeutic polypeptides comprising tumor-associated embryonic antigens and chemoattractant ligands. Cancers targeted by these developments include breast, renal, lung, ovarian, and hematological cancers.