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In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

In vitro Generation of an Autologous Thymic Organoid from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

The thymus is the only organ capable of producing conventional, mature T cells; a crucial part of the adaptive immune system. However, its efficiency and function are progressively reduced as we age, leading to a compromised immune system in the elderly. Moreover, production of T cells with specific receptors is an important concern for cancer immunotherapy. Current in vitro methods produce immature T cells that are not useful for therapy. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have generated an autologous thymic organoid from human pluripotent stem cells to address this problem. The organoid can be used to develop clinical applications such as production of autologous T and natural killer T (NKT) cells and reconstitution of the adaptive immune system. NCI is seeking licensees for the thymic organoid and the method of its generation to be used in a variety of clinical applications.

Increased Therapeutic Effectiveness of PE-Based Immunotoxins

To improve the therapeutic effectiveness of PE-based immunotoxins through multiple rounds of drug administration, NIH inventors have sought to identify and remove the human B cell epitopes within PE. Previous work demonstrated that the removal of the murine B cell and T cell epitopes from PE reduced the immunogenicity of PE and resulted in immunotoxins with improved therapeutic activity. The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Molecular Biology seeks interested parties to co-develop and commercialize immunotoxins using toxin domains lacking human B cell epitopes.

Inhibition of T Cell Differentiation and Senescence by Overexpression of Transcription Factor c-Myb

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method by which memory T cells can be generated from other T cell populations using overexpression of the transcription factor c-Myb. Importantly, these reprogrammed memory T cells show increased proliferative and survival capacity. This strategy could also potentially generate anti-tumor T cells with improved viability and therapeutic efficacy for adoptive ACT. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells

The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

Methods for Producing Stem Cell-Like Memory T Cells for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research & co-development and/or licensees for a novel, ex vivo method by which stem cell-like memory T cells (Tscm) can be generated by stimulating naïve T cells in the presence of inhibitors of GSK-3beta, which are capable of activating the Wnt pathway. These Tscm cells, generated using GSK-3beta inhibitors, display enhanced survival and proliferation upon transfer, have multipotent capacity to generate all memory and effector T cell subsets, and show increased anti-tumor activity in a humanized mouse tumor model.

Methods For Treating or Preventing Inflammation and Periodontitis

Natural products have long been considered a source of biologically active molecules against health disorders, including bone-loss related diseases. Cinnamolyoxy-mammeisin (CNM), can be isolated from Brazilian geopropolis and demonstrates anti-inflammatory activity. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with researchers at the Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Brazil, have shown CNM also demonstrates inhibition of oral bone loss. This invention is available for licensing and/or co-development opportunities.

Methods of Making Extracellular Vesicles and of Reducing Their Uptake by the Liver

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed scalable cGMP-compatible technologies to obtain highly purified engineered extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic delivery. The NCI invention 1) includes novel forms of the immunotherapeutic agent heterodimeric, interleukin-15 (hetIL-15) designed to therapeutically enhance EV and 2) provides methods of reducing liver uptake of EVs, thereby increasing delivery to target sites, such as tumors.

Methods of preventing tissue ischemia

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Pathology seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop therapeutics targeting vasodialation.

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

Methods of Producing Thymic Emigrants from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of T cells for a variety of clinical applications. However, current in vitro methods of T cell differentiation result in the generation of cells with aberrant phenotypes. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have now developed methodology for generating induced pluripotent stem cell thymic emigrants (iTE). Antigen-specific CD8αβ+ iTEs exhibited functional properties in vitro that were almost indistinguishable from natural naïve CD8αβ+ T cells, including vigorous expansion and robust anti-tumor activity. iTEs recapitulated many of the transcriptional programs of naïve T cells in vivo and revealed a striking capacity for engraftment, memory formation, and efficient tumor destruction. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Modulating Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxicity

The NCI seeks partners interested in in-licensing or co-development collaboration on CD47-targeting therapeutics for cardioprotection and autophagy modulation.

Monoclonal Antibodies and Immunoconjugates Directed to the Non-ShedPortion (“Stalk”) of Mesothelin are Excellent Candidates for Developing Therapeutic Agents

Antibodies that specifically recognize and bind to the unshed portion (“stalk”) of human mesothelin are strong therapeutic candidates because they maintain contact with the cancer cell for a longer duration than other anti-mesothelin antibodies that are currently available. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed such antibodies that specifically recognize and bind to the stalk of human mesothelin with high affinity. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors

Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Nanoparticle delivery of lung cancer therapeutic

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing an improved treatment for non-small cell lung cancer based on inhalation of nano- and microparticle therapeutics.

Nanoparticle-hydrogel Composite for Nucleic Acid Molecule Delivery

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research a co-development partner and/or licensees for applications utilizing the nanoparticle platform technology for delivery of cancer-specific microRNAs, particularly for therapeutic uses in surface cancers, such as mesothelioma.

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