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Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

siRNA Delivery Using Hexameric Tetrahedral RNA Nanostructures for Gene Silencing

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), developed a tetrahedral-shaped RNA nanoparticle for the delivery of siRNA to activate RNAi. The tetrahedral RNA nanoparticles can contain twelve Dicer substrate RNA duplexes for gene silencing. The NCI seeks parties interested in co-development or licensing of these tetrahedral RNA nanoparticles.

Novel Small Molecule Antagonists Targeting Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT1) Long Non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as Anticancer Agents

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing compounds that bind and alter the nuclear copy number of a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), with the proposed consequence of inducing slower tumor growth and a reduction in metastasis. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel small molecule antagonists targeting MALAT1 lncRNA as anticancer agents.

Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are engineered proteins that can be used in a therapeutic capacity when expressed by an immune cell (e.g., a T cell). Specifically, CARs comprise a targeting domain (such as an antibody or binding fragment thereof) as well as domains that activate immune cells. By selecting a targeting domain that binds to a protein that is selectively expressed on a cancer cell, it is possible to target immune cells to the cancer cells. Upon binding to the target cell, the immune cells are activated, leading to the destruction of the cancer cell. This therapeutic approach holds great promise, as evidenced by the recent FDA-approval of CAR-T cell therapies, KYMRIAH and YESCARTA, both of which target CD19.

Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Composed of Transmembrane Peptides and Their Application for Specific Intra-Tumor Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for peptide-based virus-like nanoparticles that are fully synthetic and capable of delivering cytotoxic, radioactive, and imaging agents. The researchers are interested in commercial partners to conduct pre-clinical and pre-IND studies.

Anti-SLAMF7 Chimeric Antigen Receptors

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapies that specifically target Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule F7 (SLAMF7) are strong therapeutic candidates for patients with Multiple Myeloma (MM). SLAMF7 is highly expressed on the malignant plasma cells that constitute MM. The expression of SLAMF7 by MM cells and lack of expression on nonhematologic cells makes SLAMF7 an attractive therapeutic target for MM. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have invented anti- SLAMF7 CAR constructs that allow genetically-modified T cells to express both the anti-SLAMF7 antibody and a suicide gene that allows T cells to specifically recognize and kill SLAMF7-expressing cells as well as allow for on-demand and reliable elimination of anti-SLAMF7 CAR T cells. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 for Treating Childhood Cancers

Cancer therapies that specifically target Glypican 2 (GPC2) are strong therapeutic candidates for pediatric patients with neuroblastoma and other GPC2 expressing cancers. The inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed and isolated two new antibodies that target GPC2 (CT3 and CT5) that are available for licensing and co-development.

Therapeutic Antitumor Combination Containing TLR4 Agonist HMGN1

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a combination of immunoadjuvants and immune checkpoint inhibitors to stimulate an immune response against cancer. The combination therapy has been tested in xenograft models and shown successful for both treatment of an existing tumor and resistance to re-challenge. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Rapid Manufacture of Retroviral Vectors Encoding Tumor-Specific T Cell Receptors for Adoptive Cell Immunotherapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method enabling rapid, GMP-compliant manufacture of retroviral vectors encoding anti-tumor T cell receptors (TCRs). T cells engineered through the use of these vectors to express tumor-reactive TCRs will be useful in adoptive cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Potassium Hydroxy Citrate Promotes Longevity and Efficacy of Anti-Tumor T cells for Adoptive Cell Therapy (ACT)

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using tumor-specific T cells leads to complete tumor regression in some cancer patients. However, limiting the efficacy of this therapy is that T cells become functionally exhausted and have short half-lives after adoptive transfer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a novel method to generate long-lived memory tumor-specific T cells with enhanced tumor clearance and persistence upon in vivo transfer. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing potassium hydroxy citrate to promote longevity and efficacy of tumor-specific T cells.

Highly Soluble Pyrimido-Dione-Quinoline Compounds: Small Molecules that Stabilize and Activate p53 in Transformed Cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention reporting the composition and function of a pyrimido-dione-quinoline that was found to inhibit HDM2’s ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity without accompanying genotoxicity. The current invention results in the stabilization of p53 in cells through the inhibition of its ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation resulting in a robust p53 response in tumors. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

Agonist Epitopes for the Development of a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Therapeutic Vaccine

To date, there is no FDA-approved therapeutic vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV). Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered agonist epitopes for the development of an HPV therapeutic vaccine. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing HPV agonist epitopes that enhance the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and lysis of human tumor cells.

Bile Acids and Other Agents that Modulate the Gut Microbiome for the Treatment of Liver Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered that primary bile acids and antibiotics are a novel therapeutic for the treatment of liver cancer and liver metastases. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing primary bile acids and antibiotics that have been demonstrated in vivo to attract natural killer T (NKT) cells to the liver and inhibit tumor development.

Tethered Interleukin-15 (IL-15)/IL-21 to Enhance T Cells for Cellular Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to improve the function of therapeutic engineered T cells used for Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) for various cancers and diseases through the co-expression of Interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-21 by a flexible linker to the cell membrane. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

T cell Receptors Which Recognize Mutated EGFR

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated T cell receptors (TCRs) that target specific mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The mutated protein recognized by these TCRs is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic applications, including engineered adoptive cell immunotherapy. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel T cell receptors that recognize EGFR mutations.

The UBE2G2 Binding Domain in the Ubiquitin Ligase GP78 and Methods of Use Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing the binding domain (G2BD) for the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ube2G2 in the gp78 ubiqutin ligase protein. The invention involves modulating the interaction between the gp78 protein and the conjugating enzyme Ube2G2. Interruption of this interaction will block degradation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in ER stress, unfolded protein response, and, ultimately, apoptosis in some cancer cells. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

T Cell Receptors Targeting p53 Hotspot Mutations and Methods of Isolating the Same

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) identified a collection of T Cell Receptors (TCRs) that target specific mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor protein. These TCRs recognize “hotspot” mutations, which frequently occur in a variety of unrelated cancers. These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel T cell receptors that recognize p53 mutations and methods for identifying p53 mutation-reactive T cell receptors.

Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4) Monoclonal Antibodies and Methods of Their Use

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed several high-affinity monoclonal antibodies to treat Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4)-related diseases including rhabdomyosarcoma and cancers of the liver, lung, pancreas, ovary and prostate. These antibodies have been used to generate antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), which are capable of specifically targeting and killing diseased cells. NCI seeks co-development opportunities or licensees for this technology.

Methods for Producing Stem Cell-Like Memory T Cells for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research & co-development and/or licensees for a novel, ex vivo method by which stem cell-like memory T cells (Tscm) can be generated by stimulating naïve T cells in the presence of inhibitors of GSK-3beta, which are capable of activating the Wnt pathway. These Tscm cells, generated using GSK-3beta inhibitors, display enhanced survival and proliferation upon transfer, have multipotent capacity to generate all memory and effector T cell subsets, and show increased anti-tumor activity in a humanized mouse tumor model.

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