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Bile Acids and Other Agents that Modulate the Gut Microbiome for the Treatment of Liver Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered that primary bile acids and antibiotics are a novel therapeutic for the treatment of liver cancer and liver metastases. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing primary bile acids and antibiotics that have been demonstrated in vivo to attract natural killer T (NKT) cells to the liver and inhibit tumor development.

Nanoparticle delivery of lung cancer therapeutic

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing an improved treatment for non-small cell lung cancer based on inhalation of nano- and microparticle therapeutics.

Agonistic Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Death Receptor 4 (DR4)

The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in licensing human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4 ("DR4"). The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its functional receptors, DR4 and DR5, have been recognized as promising targets for cancer treatment.

Use of Heterodimeric IL-15 in Adoptive Cell Transfer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a technology that provides methods of performing adoptive cell transfer (ACT), an immunotherapeutic approach for cancer treatment, by administering a heterodimeric Interleukin 15/Interleukin 15 receptor alpha (IL-15/IL-15Rα) complex (hetlL-15) in the absence of lymphodepletion, thereby eliminating any lymphodepletion-associated detrimental side effects.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain (“Plk1 PBD Portfolio”)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). These compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Chimeric Adaptor Proteins (CAPs) Containing a Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) and a Kinase Domain for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapy

There remains a need for effective immunotherapies to treat solid tumors as well as hematological malignancies. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have designed novel chimeric adaptor proteins (CAPs) consisting of signaling molecules downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) for use in T cell-mediated immunotherapy. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing CAPs that can be used in immunotherapy for treating cancer, including both hematological and solid malignancies.

NSAIDs that Assist the Treatment of Human Diseases

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed compounds containing both a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and a nitroxyl (HNO) -releasing agent that have significantly reduced toxicity, allowing their use for extended periods of time without severe side effects.The HNO-releasing moiety contained in this invention may expand the medical utility of NSAIDs. HNO releasing agents possess anticancer activity as well as good antioxidant properties, which has potential benefit for a variety of human diseases, including acute and chronic inflammation. NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop this technology.

Enhanced Cancer Chemotherapy Using the Bioactive Peptide Recifin And Its Analogues

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) discovered that the cyclic peptide recifin inhibits the activity of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a molecular target for the sensitization of cancer cells to the topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitor camptothecin and its chemotherapeutic derivatives – such as topotecan and irinotecan. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of recifin and its analogues as new chemosensitizing agents in adjunct therapies to enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to topotecan, irinotecan and related chemotherapeutic agents.

Schweinfurthins and Uses Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel analogs of the natural product schweinfurthins to treat neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The compounds demonstrate effective growth inhibition in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cell lines and mouse models of astrocytomas. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaboration opportunities to further develop the schweinfurthin analogs.

Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Composed of Transmembrane Peptides and Their Application for Specific Intra-Tumor Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for peptide-based virus-like nanoparticles that are fully synthetic and capable of delivering cytotoxic, radioactive, and imaging agents. The researchers are interested in commercial partners to conduct pre-clinical and pre-IND studies.

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

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