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EGFRvIII Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated seven monoclonal antibodies that bind to the human epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) but not wildtype EGFR. The NCI seeks research co-development partners or licensees for monoclonal antibodies that specifically target cancer-expressed EGFR.

T-cell Receptors Targeting CD20-Positive Lymphomas and Leukemias

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for a collection of T-cell receptors (TCRs) that specifically target the CD20 antigen expressed in B-lymphoid malignancies such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The TCRs are being developed as therapeutics for the treatment of lymphomas and leukemias.

Tethered Interleukin-15 (IL-15)/IL-21 to Enhance T Cells for Cellular Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to improve the function of therapeutic engineered T cells used for Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) for various cancers and diseases through the co-expression of Interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-21 by a flexible linker to the cell membrane. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for this invention.

New T-Cell Immunotherapy that Targets Aggressive Epithelial Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch (NCI ETIB) developed a T Cell receptor that specifically targets the Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen 1 (KK-LC-1) 52-60 epitope that is highly expressed by several common and aggressive epithelial tumor types.

T Cell Receptors Targeting KRAS Mutants for Cancer Immunotherapy/Adoptive Cell Therapy

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health identified a collection of TCRs that exclusively recognize the common hotspot driver mutations in KRAS antigen, expressed by a variety of epithelial cancers, including pancreatic, colorectal and lung cancer. The mutated KRAS variants are recognized by the TCRs in the context of specific Class I/Class II HLA alleles. These TCRs can be used for a variety of experimental therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications.

Cancer Immunotherapy Using Virus-like Particles

A considerable effort has been devoted to identifying and targeting specific extracellular cancer markers using antibody based therapies. However, diminished access to new cancer cell surface markers has limited the development of corresponding antibodies. NCI Technology Transfer Center is seeking to license cancer immunotherapy using virus-like particles.

Peptide Inhibitors for Viral Infections and as Anti-inflammatory Agents

IFN-gamma and IL-10 are cytokine signaling molecules that play fundamental roles in inflammation, cancer growth and autoimmune diseases.  Unfortunately, there are no specific inhibitors of IFN-gamma or IL-10 on the market to date. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop selective IL-10 and IFN-gamma peptide inhibitors.

Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles for Triggering RNA Interference

RNA interference (RNAi) is a naturally occurring cellular post-transcriptional gene regulation process that utilizes small double-stranded RNAs to trigger and guide gene silencing. By introducing synthetic RNA duplexes called small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs), we can harness the RNAi machinery for therapeutic gene control and the treatment of various diseases. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to license or co-develop RNA, RNA-DNA, and DNA-RNA hybrid nanoparticles consisting of a DNA or RNA core with attached RNA or DNA hybrid duplexes.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. The NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations.

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