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Methods of Producing T-cell Populations Using P38 MAPK Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method of producing larger populations of minimally-differentiated T-cells. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize this novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors.

Immunotherapeutics for Pediatric Solid Tumors

The National Cancer Institute’s Pediatric Oncology Branch seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop new immunotherapeutic agents based on chimeric antigen receptor (CARs) for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

Use of the TP5 Peptide for the Treatment of Cancer

Increased cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activity has recently emerged as a contributor to cancer progression. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have shown that TP5, a small peptide inhibitor of CDK5 modified to facilitate passage through the blood brain barrier (BBB), has potential therapeutic benefit in glioblastoma (GBM) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC). NCI is seeking parties interested in co-developing and/or licensing TP5 for its use in the treatment of cancers with aberrant CDK5 expression as a mono-therapy or in an adjuvant setting with current standard-of-care.

Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells

The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

New Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Format for Developing Improved Adoptive Cell Therapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a new format for expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) that is available for licensing and co-development. The inventors found that there was an increased therapeutic effect when using their proprietary (anti-glypican 3 [GPC3]) hYP7 antibody in this format. The novel technology is useful for improving CAR therapies to treat a range of cancers.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-1

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two Glypican-1- (GPC1)- specific antibodies: the mouse monoclonal antibody HM2 that binds the C-lobe of GPC1 close to the cell surface, and the camel single domain antibody D4. The D4 single domain antibody (also called ‘nanobody’) has a high affinity for GPC1-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

High Affinity Cross Species Single Domain Antibodies Targeting Mesothelin

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two high affinity anti-mesothelin single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies), A101 and G8. These antibodies have been isolated from NCI’s newly developed camel single domain (VHH) libraries by phage display. The antibodies have a high affinity for mesothelin-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

Use of Acetalax for Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development and/or potential licensees for a potential novel treatment for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) with acetalax (oxyphenisatin acetate). Acetalax is a previously FDA approved drug that has been used as a topical laxative but is being repurposed here as an onco-therapy because of its cytotoxic effects on a number of TNBC and other cancer cell lines.

Use of Cucurbitacins and Withanolides for the Treatment of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer Inflammation Program, seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of certain cucurbatacins or withanolides in combination with pro-apoptotic agonists of TRAIL death receptors for cancer therapy.

Cancer Immunotherapy Using Virus-like Particles

A considerable effort has been devoted to identifying and targeting specific extracellular cancer markers using antibody based therapies. However, diminished access to new cancer cell surface markers has limited the development of corresponding antibodies. NCI Technology Transfer Center is seeking to license cancer immunotherapy using virus-like particles.

Analogues of Withanolide E Sensitize Cancer Cells Toward Apoptosis

There is a need to develop compounds that can sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducing ligands, such as poly I:C and TRAIL. In collaboration with the University of Arizona, NCI investigators discovered a series of compounds in the withanolide family that synergistically enhance the response of cancer cells to treatment with an apoptosis-inducing ligand. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development of withanolide E analogues for the treatment of cancer.

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