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Showing 21-40 of 132 results found

Compounds that Interfere with the Androgen Receptor Complex

NCI researchers have identified novel compounds that inhibit FKBP52-mediated activation of the androgen receptor protein (AR), a major target for anti-prostate cancer therapeutic development. As FKBP52 is implicated in the regulation of other hormone receptors, anti-FKBP52 may be applicable in the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases such as diabetes or even used as contraceptives. NCI seeks partners to license or co-develop this technology.

Peptide Hydrogels for Rate-Controlled Delivery of Therapeutics

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel delivery platform in which the scaffold of an anionic hydrogel (AcVES3) can be attenuated to deliver therapeutic small molecules, peptides, proteins, nanoparticles, or whole cells. The NCI seeks collaborators and licensees for the development of this technology in various clinical and laboratory applications.

The UBE2G2 Binding Domain in the Ubiquitin Ligase GP78 and Methods of Use Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing the binding domain (G2BD) for the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ube2G2 in the gp78 ubiqutin ligase protein. The invention involves modulating the interaction between the gp78 protein and the conjugating enzyme Ube2G2. Interruption of this interaction will block degradation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in ER stress, unfolded protein response, and, ultimately, apoptosis in some cancer cells. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

Near-IR Light-Cleavable Antibody Conjugates and Conjugate Precursors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel groups of cyanine (Cy) based antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) chemical linkers that undergo photolytic cleavage upon irradiation with near-IR light. By using the fluorescent properties of the Cy linker to monitor localization of the ADC, and subsequent near-IR irradiation of cancerous tissue, drug release could be confined to the tumor microenvironment.

Agonist Epitopes for the Development of a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Therapeutic Vaccine

To date, there is no FDA-approved therapeutic vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV). Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered agonist epitopes for the development of an HPV therapeutic vaccine. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing HPV agonist epitopes that enhance the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and lysis of human tumor cells.

Bile Acids and Other Agents that Modulate the Gut Microbiome for the Treatment of Liver Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered that primary bile acids and antibiotics are a novel therapeutic for the treatment of liver cancer and liver metastases. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing primary bile acids and antibiotics that have been demonstrated in vivo to attract natural killer T (NKT) cells to the liver and inhibit tumor development.

Nanoparticle delivery of lung cancer therapeutic

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing an improved treatment for non-small cell lung cancer based on inhalation of nano- and microparticle therapeutics.

Use of Heterodimeric IL-15 in Adoptive Cell Transfer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a technology that provides methods of performing adoptive cell transfer (ACT), an immunotherapeutic approach for cancer treatment, by administering a heterodimeric Interleukin 15/Interleukin 15 receptor alpha (IL-15/IL-15Rα) complex (hetlL-15) in the absence of lymphodepletion, thereby eliminating any lymphodepletion-associated detrimental side effects.

Agonistic Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Death Receptor 4 (DR4)

The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in licensing human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4 ("DR4"). The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its functional receptors, DR4 and DR5, have been recognized as promising targets for cancer treatment.

Chimeric Adaptor Proteins (CAPs) Containing a Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) and a Kinase Domain for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapy

There remains a need for effective immunotherapies to treat solid tumors as well as hematological malignancies. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have designed novel chimeric adaptor proteins (CAPs) consisting of signaling molecules downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) for use in T cell-mediated immunotherapy. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing CAPs that can be used in immunotherapy for treating cancer, including both hematological and solid malignancies.

Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Composed of Transmembrane Peptides and Their Application for Specific Intra-Tumor Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for peptide-based virus-like nanoparticles that are fully synthetic and capable of delivering cytotoxic, radioactive, and imaging agents. The researchers are interested in commercial partners to conduct pre-clinical and pre-IND studies.

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