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Coacervate Micoparticles Useful for the Sustained Release of Therapeutic Agents

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have discovered novel microparticles that are formed using a coacervation process; the biodegradable microbead or microparticle is useful for the sustained localized delivery of biologically active proteins or other molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The microparticles have a matrix structure comprised of the reaction product of at least one cationic polymer, at least one anionic polymer, and a binding component (e.g. gelatin, chondroitin sulfate, avidin).

Combination Cancer Therapy with HDAC Inhibitors

NCI researchers developed a combination therapy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and immunotherapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, virus-based vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, cell-based treatments or radiopharmaceuticals. The NCI Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology seeks parties to license or co-develop this method.

Combination Therapy for Prostate and Breast Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute developed a novel method of immunogenic modulation in androgen and endocrine deprivation therapy. A combination of hormone therapy with immunotherapies such as PROSTVAC™, a Brachyury vaccine, PROVENGE™, ipilumimab, nivolumab, XOFIGO™, PANVAC, a yeast-MUC-1 immunotherapeutic, or HERCEPTIN™ can benefit prostate and breast cancer patients, especially those who have acquired resistances. The researchers seek parties to co-develop this method.

Compounds that Interfere with the Androgen Receptor Complex

NCI researchers have identified novel compounds that inhibit FKBP52-mediated activation of the androgen receptor protein (AR), a major target for anti-prostate cancer therapeutic development. As FKBP52 is implicated in the regulation of other hormone receptors, anti-FKBP52 may be applicable in the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases such as diabetes or even used as contraceptives. NCI seeks partners to license or co-develop this technology.

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

Ex-vivo Production of Regulatory B-Cells for Use in Auto-immune Diseases

Regulatory B-cells (Breg) play an important role in reducing autoimmunity and reduced levels of these cells are implicated in etiology of several auto-inflammatory diseases. Despite their impact in many diseases, their physiological inducers are unknown.  The National Eye Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a process for the production of regulatory B-Cells for use in auto-immune indications.

Fatty Acid Derivatives and Their Use

Researchers at the National Institutes on Aging (NIA) seek research co-development or licensees for novel compounds and pharmaceutical formulations to treat autoimmune disorder and inflammation. Other potential indications for these compounds include pain, itching, and/or skin disorders.

Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4) Monoclonal Antibodies and Methods of Their Use

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed several high-affinity monoclonal antibodies to treat Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4)-related diseases including rhabdomyosarcoma and cancers of the liver, lung, pancreas, ovary and prostate. These antibodies have been used to generate antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), which are capable of specifically targeting and killing diseased cells. NCI seeks co-development opportunities or licensees for this technology.

Fully-human Heavy-chain-only Anti-B-cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs)

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapies that specifically target B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) are strong therapeutic candidates for patients with plasma cell malignancy diseases such as, multiple myeloma (MM), as well as for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. BCMA is a cell surface protein preferentially expressed on a subset of B cells and mature plasma cells, but not on other cells in the body. The limited expression of BCMA on B and plasma cells makes BCMA an attractive therapeutic target for B cell and plasma cell malignancy diseases. The 12 anti-BCMA CARs described are fully human CARS and have the potential to treat patients with various plasma cell and B cell malignancy diseases.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

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