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Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Compounds, Methods of Preparation, Intermediates Thereof, and their Methods of Use

Scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) have developed novel dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) agonists with high affinity and selectivity. Two lead compounds, 53 and eutomer 53a, have demonstrated significantly higher D3R binding selectivity than reference compounds. Moreover, 53 and 53a showed metabolic stability in liver microsomes, which is favorable for the future use of these compounds as therapeutic agents for diseases related to dopamine system dysregulation such as Parkinson’s Disease and Restless Legs Syndrome. Researchers at NIDA seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the use of these D3R agonists as molecular tools for the study of D3R physiology and as potential therapeutics to treat neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.

Dual Specific Anti-CD22 Anti-CD19 Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs)

Inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target two B cell surface antigens, CD19 and CD22, improving treatment of B-cell malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). NCI is actively seeking parties interested in licensing this invention to commercialize the bicistronic CAR construct targeting CD19 and CD22 for immunotherapy.

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

Efficient Methods to Prepare Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in vitro for Therapeutic Use

Multi-potential hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) can differentiate into any class of blood cells, and are highly useful in regenerative medicine, immunology, and cancer immunotherapy. Current methods to generate HPCs are limited either due to the use of animal products, or the high cost and low efficiency of animal product free systems. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a protocol to prepare HPCs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture condition. Thus, they are able to generate HPCs in a fully human, autologous system, which can be used to further generate immune cells for therapy. This protocol is adaptable to mass production by bioreactors. NCI seeks licensees for these methods of generating HPCs in a 3D co-culture with hMSCs to be used in a variety of applications such as treatment of blood disorders, regenerative medicine, and antibody production.

EGFRvIII Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated seven monoclonal antibodies that bind to the human epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) but not wildtype EGFR. The NCI seeks research co-development partners or licensees for monoclonal antibodies that specifically target cancer-expressed EGFR.

Enhanced Cancer Chemotherapy Using the Bioactive Peptide Recifin And Its Analogues

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) discovered that the cyclic peptide recifin inhibits the activity of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a molecular target for the sensitization of cancer cells to the topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitor camptothecin and its chemotherapeutic derivatives – such as topotecan and irinotecan. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of recifin and its analogues as new chemosensitizing agents in adjunct therapies to enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to topotecan, irinotecan and related chemotherapeutic agents.

Ex-vivo Production of Regulatory B-Cells for Use in Auto-immune Diseases

Regulatory B-cells (Breg) play an important role in reducing autoimmunity and reduced levels of these cells are implicated in etiology of several auto-inflammatory diseases. Despite their impact in many diseases, their physiological inducers are unknown.  The National Eye Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a process for the production of regulatory B-Cells for use in auto-immune indications.

Extremely Rapid Method to Isolate Neoantigen Reactive T Cell Receptors (TCRs)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method for identifying neoantigen reactive T cells and T cell receptors (TCRs), isolated from fresh tumors of common epithelial cancers. This highly specific and sensitive method allows rapid determination of the neoantigen reactive TCR sequences and can be very useful to translate this information into TCR-engineered T-cell populations for immunotherapy without the need to grow tumor infiltrating T-cells and expensive, time-consuming screening. The NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for this invention.

Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4) Monoclonal Antibodies and Methods of Their Use

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed several high-affinity monoclonal antibodies to treat Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4)-related diseases including rhabdomyosarcoma and cancers of the liver, lung, pancreas, ovary and prostate. These antibodies have been used to generate antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), which are capable of specifically targeting and killing diseased cells. NCI seeks co-development opportunities or licensees for this technology.

Fully-human Heavy-chain-only Anti-B-cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs)

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapies that specifically target B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) are strong therapeutic candidates for patients with plasma cell malignancy diseases such as, multiple myeloma (MM), as well as for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. BCMA is a cell surface protein preferentially expressed on a subset of B cells and mature plasma cells, but not on other cells in the body. The limited expression of BCMA on B and plasma cells makes BCMA an attractive therapeutic target for B cell and plasma cell malignancy diseases. The 12 anti-BCMA CARs described are fully human CARS and have the potential to treat patients with various plasma cell and B cell malignancy diseases.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

Novel fusion proteins with good stability and potency against HIV-1. These fusion proteins have good drug properties and potential as prophylactics or therapeutics against HIV-1 infection. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for the development and commercialization of novel fusion proteins as therapeutics or prophylactics against HIV-1 infection.

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