You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 1-20 of 254 results found

Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) for Treatment of Solid Tumors

Scientists at National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Cancer Research (CCR) identified selective tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) inhibitors that may be used in combination with topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors for synergistic treatment of solid tumors. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for commercializing the TDP1 inhibitors as part of an anti-cancer therapy.

T Cell Receptors Targeting CDKN2A Mutations for Cancer Immunotherapy

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a collection of T-cell receptors (TCRs) that specifically target CDKN2A mutations. CDKN2A mutations are present in a myriad of cancers. Therefore, these TCRs may be used for engineering TCR-based therapies with therapeutic potential for a broad cancer patient population.

T Cell Receptors Targeting BRAF V600E Mutation for Cancer Immunotherapy

The NCI seeks parties interested in research co-development and/or licensing of TCRs targeting the BRAF V600E mutation. These TCRs are HLA-A*0301 restricted. The BRAF V600E mutation is common among cancer patients, giving the TCRs broad therapeutic potential in immunotherapy against multiple cancers.

Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. The NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations.

Small Molecule Inhibitors of Drug Resistant Forms of HIV-1 Integrase

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute discovered small-molecule compounds whose activity against HIV-1 integrase mutants confer greater resistance than currently approved INSTIs. Preliminary DMPK and ADME studies have been completed by the NCI researchers. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to commercialize this class of compounds through licensing or co-development.

Nitric Oxide-Releasing Polysaccharide Materials

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute have developed materials derived from polysaccharides that are capable of releasing nitric oxide into the surrounding environment. These materials could be incorporated into surgical dressings, cotton bandages, cellulose filters and dialysis membranes, or other medical devices

Nanobodies Neutralizing Lassa Virus

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek parties interested in collaborative research and/or licensing to further develop neutralizing nanobodies targeting Lassa virus as a possible treatment of Lassa virus infections.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Cancer Therapeutic Based on Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) Inhibitors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed small molecule compounds that inhibit activity of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). The HIF-1 inhibitor compounds are designed around the scaffold of naturally occurring metabolite eudistidine. The invention compounds have demonstrated activity against cancer and malaria in vitro.

T-cell Receptor Targeting Human Papillomavirus-16 E6 Oncoprotein

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that confers high-avidity recognition of the HPV-specific oncoprotein E6. The TCR may be used in an adoptive cell therapy approach utilizing genetically engineered lymphocytes to treat HPV-positive malignancies.

PIM-Targeted PROTACs

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a series of PIM Kinase targeting PROTACS.

Pages