You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 41-60 of 218 results found

Angiogenesis-Based Cancer Therapeutic

The National Cancer Institute's Urologic Oncology Branch seeks interested parties to co-develop antagonists to VEGF-A and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) that block signal transduction and associated cellular responses.

Bile Acids and Other Agents that Modulate the Gut Microbiome for the Treatment of Liver Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered that primary bile acids and antibiotics are a novel therapeutic for the treatment of liver cancer and liver metastases. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing primary bile acids and antibiotics that have been demonstrated in vivo to attract natural killer T (NKT) cells to the liver and inhibit tumor development.

Metformin for the Treatment of Age-related Retinal Degeneration

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have generated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPS) from two Late-Onset Reginal (L-ORD) patients with a dominant mutation in CTRP5 protein and two of their unaffected siblings. All iPS cells were differentiated into authenticated Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) cells. The NEI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for Metformin as an FDA-approved drug to treat Age-related Retinal Degeneration.

Methods of preventing tissue ischemia

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Pathology seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop therapeutics targeting vasodialation.

Novel Murine T-Cell Receptors for Treating Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

Metastatic thyroid cancer can be resistant to current treatment options such as radioactive iodine therapy. Targeting thyroglobulin, a thyroid-specific antigen, as part of an adoptive cell therapy approach will allow for new therapeutic possibilities. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel T-cell receptors for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer.

Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

Chimeric Adaptor Proteins (CAPs) Containing a Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) and a Kinase Domain for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapy

There remains a need for effective immunotherapies to treat solid tumors as well as hematological malignancies. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have designed novel chimeric adaptor proteins (CAPs) consisting of signaling molecules downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) for use in T cell-mediated immunotherapy. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing CAPs that can be used in immunotherapy for treating cancer, including both hematological and solid malignancies.

Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are engineered proteins that can be used in a therapeutic capacity when expressed by an immune cell (e.g., a T cell). Specifically, CARs comprise a targeting domain (such as an antibody or binding fragment thereof) as well as domains that activate immune cells. By selecting a targeting domain that binds to a protein that is selectively expressed on a cancer cell, it is possible to target immune cells to the cancer cells. Upon binding to the target cell, the immune cells are activated, leading to the destruction of the cancer cell. This therapeutic approach holds great promise, as evidenced by the recent FDA-approval of CAR-T cell therapies, KYMRIAH and YESCARTA, both of which target CD19.

Treating Cancer with Anti-Angiogenic Chimeric Antigen Receptors

Researchers at the NCI have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) with a high affinity for VEGFR2. Many cancers and solid tumors from endothelial cells overexpress VEGFR2 making that prime targets for treatment with these specific CARs.

Phosphodiesterase as a target for cancer therapeutics

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute have discovered fluoroquinolone derivatives as specific Tdp1 inhibitors that could potentiate the pharmacological action of Top1 inhibitors currently used in cancer treatment.

Pages