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Showing 21-40 of 196 results found

Tethered Interleukin-15 (IL-15)/IL-21 to Enhance T Cells for Cellular Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to improve the function of therapeutic engineered T cells used for Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) for various cancers and diseases through the co-expression of Interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-21 by a flexible linker to the cell membrane. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Targeted RNA/DNA Nanoparticles with Single Stranded RNA Toeholds

The technology is directed to the use of single-stranded RNA overhangs or toeholds of varying lengths (< 12 nucleotides) contained in nucleic acid-based nanoparticles which trigger the association of these nanoparticles and activates multiple functionalities such as gene silencing and/or cell-specific targeting. The use of RNA toeholds is superior to that of DNA toeholds in that it allows for smaller nanoparticles (fewer nucleotides for the toeholds) resulting in greater chemical stability, less immunogenic and higher yield of production. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for use of RNA overhangs or toeholds in nucleic acid nanoparticles.

T-Cell Receptors Targeting Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen 1 (KK-LC-1)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch (NCI ETIB) have developed a T Cell receptor (TCR) that specifically targets the Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen 1 (KK-LC-1) 52-60 and 90-99 epitopes which are highly expressed by several common and aggressive epithelial tumor types.

T cell Receptors Which Recognize Mutated EGFR

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated T cell receptors (TCRs) that target specific mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The mutated protein recognized by these TCRs is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic applications, including engineered adoptive cell immunotherapy. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel T cell receptors that recognize EGFR mutations.

T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen

The National Cancer Institute, Surgery Branch, Tumor Immunology Section, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize T Cells Attacking Cancer: T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen

T Cell Receptors Targeting p53 Hotspot Mutations and Methods of Isolating the Same

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) identified a collection of T Cell Receptors (TCRs) that target specific mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor protein. These TCRs recognize “hotspot” mutations, which frequently occur in a variety of unrelated cancers. These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel T cell receptors that recognize p53 mutations and methods for identifying p53 mutation-reactive T cell receptors.

Synthetic lipopeptide inhibitors of RAS oncoproteins

It is well known that overactive Ras signaling is linked to many forms of cancer, and despite intensive efforts worldwide to develop effective inhibitors of Ras, to date there is no anti-Ras inhibitor in clinical use. Researchers at the NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, in collaboration with scientists at Vanderbilt University and the University of Illinois in Chicago, have identified a number of small peptidomimetic compounds that bind to Ras proteins with nanomolar affinity. NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of synthetic, highly potent cell-permeable inhibitors of Ras that bind to the protein directly.

Synergistic Combination Agent for Cancer Therapy

The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory of the Frederick National Laboratory for Biomedical Research seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop a ceramide and vinca alkaloid combination therapy for treatment of cancer.

Sterculic Acid Treatment for Choroidal Neovascularization

The National Eye Institute (NEI) Laboratory of Retinal Cell and Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in licensing use of sterculic acid and its derivatives for the treatment of diseases related to angiogenesis or mediated by 7-ketocholesterol-induced inflammation, in particular, atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration, and Alzheimer''s disease.

Small Molecule Inhibitors of Drug Resistant Forms of HIV-1 Integrase

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute discovered small-molecule compounds containing 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,8-naphthyridine moieties whose activity against HIV-1 integrase mutants confer resistance to currently approved INSTIs. Preliminary rodent efficacy, metabolic, and pharmacokinetic studies have been completed by the NCI researchers. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to commercialize this class of compounds through licensing or co-development.

Small Molecule Anti-cancer Agents that Stabilize the MYC-G-Quadruplex

The proto-oncogene c-Myc is deregulated and overexpressed in ~70% of all cancers. Thus, c-Myc is an attractive therapeutic target. Beyond cancer, Myc is also a positive effector of tissue inflammation, and its function has been implicated in the pathophysiology of heart failure. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel small molecules that target c-Myc at the transcriptional level, thus enabling a potential pan-cancer therapeutic. Specifically, these compounds stabilize the transcription repressing quadruplex in the c-Myc gene promoter region. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.'

siRNA Delivery Using Hexameric Tetrahedral RNA Nanostructures for Gene Silencing

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), developed a tetrahedral-shaped RNA nanoparticle for the delivery of siRNA to activate RNAi. The tetrahedral RNA nanoparticles can contain twelve Dicer substrate RNA duplexes for gene silencing. The NCI seeks parties interested in co-development or licensing of these tetrahedral RNA nanoparticles.

Single domain CD4, HIV-1 Antibodies, and Fusion Proteins for treatment of HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed single domain human CD4 proteins to inhibit HIV-1 entry and improved human domain antibodies against HIV-1. Fusion proteins comprising the single domain CD4 and HIV-1 antibody can be used to effectively neutralize HIV-1 in vitro. Researchers seek licensing for development of these antibody-based therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1.

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