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Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

New T-Cell Immunotherapy that Targets Aggressive Epithelial Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch (NCI ETIB) developed a T Cell receptor that specifically targets the Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen 1 (KK-LC-1) 52-60 epitope that is highly expressed by several common and aggressive epithelial tumor types.

Synthetic Bacterial Nanoparticles as Drug and Vaccine Delivery Vehicles

Engineered bacterial spores can provide many useful functions such as the treatment of infections, use as an adjuvant for the delivery of vaccines, and the enzymatic degradation of environmental pollutants. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology have developed a novel, synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayer (SSHEL) particle that is uniquely suited for a variety of these functions. NCI seeks partners to license and/or co-develop this technology toward commercialization.

Treatment of GPR101-Related, Growth Hormone-Related Disorders Such as Gigantism, Dwarfism or Acromegaly

Researchers at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) have developed a cell line that stably over-expresses GPR101. GPR101 inhibitors and agonists may be used to treat gigantism, acromegaly or dwarfism. The NICHD seeks licensing and/or co-development research partners to collaborate on the identification and characterization of GPR101 inhibitors (antagonists and inverse agonists) and agonists with the goal of identifying agents to treat gigantism, acromegaly or dwarfism.

Selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs) confer protection against photoreceptor degeneration

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have discovered a novel therapeutic strategy of using one or more selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), which may include the FDA-approved drug, Tamoxifen, for treating retinal degenerative diseases, like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related degeneration (AMD). SERMs exert their specific protection on photoreceptor degeneration likely by inhibiting microglial activation.

Use of Heterodimeric IL-15 in Adoptive Cell Transfer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a technology that provides methods of performing adoptive cell transfer (ACT), an immunotherapeutic approach for cancer treatment, by administering a heterodimeric Interleukin 15/Interleukin 15 receptor alpha (IL-15/IL-15Rα) complex (hetlL-15) in the absence of lymphodepletion, thereby eliminating any lymphodepletion-associated detrimental side effects.

Methods of Making Extracellular Vesicles and of Reducing Their Uptake by the Liver

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed scalable cGMP-compatible technologies to obtain highly purified engineered extracellular vesicles (EVs) for therapeutic delivery. The NCI invention 1) includes novel forms of the immunotherapeutic agent heterodimeric, interleukin-15 (hetIL-15) designed to therapeutically enhance EV and 2) provides methods of reducing liver uptake of EVs, thereby increasing delivery to target sites, such as tumors.

Coacervate Micoparticles Useful for the Sustained Release of Therapeutic Agents

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have discovered novel microparticles that are formed using a coacervation process; the biodegradable microbead or microparticle is useful for the sustained localized delivery of biologically active proteins or other molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The microparticles have a matrix structure comprised of the reaction product of at least one cationic polymer, at least one anionic polymer, and a binding component (e.g. gelatin, chondroitin sulfate, avidin).

Antibody and Immunotoxin Treatments for Mesothelin-expressing Cancers

The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize antibody-based treatments of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

Nanoparticle delivery of lung cancer therapeutic

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing an improved treatment for non-small cell lung cancer based on inhalation of nano- and microparticle therapeutics.

In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

Sterculic Acid Treatment for Choroidal Neovascularization

The National Eye Institute (NEI) Laboratory of Retinal Cell and Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in licensing use of sterculic acid and its derivatives for the treatment of diseases related to angiogenesis or mediated by 7-ketocholesterol-induced inflammation, in particular, atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration, and Alzheimer''s disease.

Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against Dengue Viruses

Researchers at NCI's  Cancer and Inflammation Program developed fully human monoclonal antibodies that bind and neutralize dengue type 1, 2, 3 and 4 viruses. The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties interested in licensing fully human monoclonal antibodies as possible therapeutics and prophylactics, as well as a template for a Dengue vaccine.

Near-IR Light-Cleavable Antibody Conjugates and Conjugate Precursors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel groups of cyanine (Cy) based antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) chemical linkers that undergo photolytic cleavage upon irradiation with near-IR light. By using the fluorescent properties of the Cy linker to monitor localization of the ADC, and subsequent near-IR irradiation of cancerous tissue, drug release could be confined to the tumor microenvironment.

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