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Anti-bacterial Treatments Using Peptide-Based Inhibitors of the STAT3-IL10 Pathway

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that typically affects the lungs. Current therapies include a panel of antibiotics given over a range of 6-9 months. As a result of the expense of treatment, the extended timeframe needed for effective treatment, and the scarcity of medicines in some developing countries, patient compliance with TB treatment is very low and results in multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). There remains a need for a faster, more effective treatment for TB. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development of peptide inhibitors of STAT3 and IL-10 developed to treat bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. See aslo: NIH inventions E-164-2007 and E-167-2010

Novel Murine T-Cell Receptors for Treating Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

Metastatic thyroid cancer can be resistant to current treatment options such as radioactive iodine therapy. Targeting thyroglobulin, a thyroid-specific antigen, as part of an adoptive cell therapy approach will allow for new therapeutic possibilities. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel T-cell receptors for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer.

Inhibition of T Cell Differentiation and Senescence by Overexpression of Transcription Factor c-Myb

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method by which memory T cells can be generated from other T cell populations using overexpression of the transcription factor c-Myb. Importantly, these reprogrammed memory T cells show increased proliferative and survival capacity. This strategy could also potentially generate anti-tumor T cells with improved viability and therapeutic efficacy for adoptive ACT. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

New T-Cell Immunotherapy that Targets Aggressive Epithelial Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch (NCI ETIB) developed a T Cell receptor that specifically targets the Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen 1 (KK-LC-1) 52-60 epitope that is highly expressed by several common and aggressive epithelial tumor types.

Sterculic Acid Treatment for Choroidal Neovascularization

The National Eye Institute (NEI) Laboratory of Retinal Cell and Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in licensing use of sterculic acid and its derivatives for the treatment of diseases related to angiogenesis or mediated by 7-ketocholesterol-induced inflammation, in particular, atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration, and Alzheimer''s disease.

MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors

Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

Human Antibodies Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antibody-based therapeutic against MERS-CoV, including animal studies, cGMP manufacturing, and clinical trials.

Synergistic Combination Agent for Cancer Therapy

The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory of the Frederick National Laboratory for Biomedical Research seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop a ceramide and vinca alkaloid combination therapy for treatment of cancer.

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

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