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Molecular Nanotags for Detection of Single Molecules

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel molecular nanotags for single biological nanoparticle detection, resolution, and sorting, by flow cytometry. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further advance this technology with extremely broad biomedical, biodefense, industrial, environmental, and other applications.

Optical Configuration Methods for Spectral Scatter Flow Cytometry

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensees or co-development partners for a multispectral detection method capable of discriminating different Molecular NanoTag components. The capacity to discriminate further increases the sensitivity of detection for NanoTag molecules. Adaptations of this technology could also apply to incorporate spectral scatter detection in other cytometric and microfluidic systems.

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

Adjuvanted Mucosal Subunit Vaccines for Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Transmission and Infection

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered an adjuvanted mucosal subunit vaccine to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission and infection. The mucosal vaccine is composed of a novel molecular adjuvant nanoparticle that induces robust humoral and cellular immunity, as well as trained innate immunity with enhanced protection against respiratory SARS-CoV-2 exposure. The technology is available for potential licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.

Conserved Elements Vaccine for HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a DNA vaccine using conserved elements of HIV-1 Gag, administered in a prime-boost vaccination protocol. Two of the HIV Gag CE DNA vectors have been tested in a rhesus macaque model. Priming with the Gag CE vaccine and boosting with full length Gag DNA showed increased immune responses when compared to vaccination with Gag alone. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development this DNA vaccine.

Anti-Viral Compounds that Inhibit HIV Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Targets Laboratory is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antiviral tropolone derivatives developed by systematic medicinal chemistry on the lead series.

Methods for Producing Stem Cell-Like Memory T Cells for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research & co-development and/or licensees for a novel, ex vivo method by which stem cell-like memory T cells (Tscm) can be generated by stimulating naïve T cells in the presence of inhibitors of GSK-3beta, which are capable of activating the Wnt pathway. These Tscm cells, generated using GSK-3beta inhibitors, display enhanced survival and proliferation upon transfer, have multipotent capacity to generate all memory and effector T cell subsets, and show increased anti-tumor activity in a humanized mouse tumor model.

Vaccines for HIV

The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

Micro-Dose Calibrator for Pre-clinical Radiotracer Assays

Pre-clinical radiotracer biomedical research involves the use of compounds labeled with radioisotopes, including radio-ligand bio-distribution studies, cell binding studies, immune cell labeling techniques, and α-based therapies. Before this Micro-Dose Calibrator, measurement of pre-clinical level dosage for small animal studies was inaccurate and unreliable. This dose calibrator is a prototype ready for customer testing and scale-up. It is designed to accurately measure radioactive doses in the range of 50 nCi (1.8 kBq) to 100 µCi (3.7 MBq) with 99% precision. The NCI seeks co-development or licensing to commercialize it. Alternative uses will be considered.

Single domain CD4, HIV-1 Antibodies, and Fusion Proteins for treatment of HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed single domain human CD4 proteins to inhibit HIV-1 entry and improved human domain antibodies against HIV-1. Fusion proteins comprising the single domain CD4 and HIV-1 antibody can be used to effectively neutralize HIV-1 in vitro. Researchers seek licensing for development of these antibody-based therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1.

Methods of analyzing virus-derived therapeutics

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Biopharmaceutical Development Program recently developed massively parallel sequencing methods for virus-derived therapeutics such as viral vaccines and oncolytic immunotherapies, for which the NCI seeks licensees or co-development collaborations.

Human Antibodies Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antibody-based therapeutic against MERS-CoV, including animal studies, cGMP manufacturing, and clinical trials.

Small Molecule Inhibitors of Drug Resistant Forms of HIV-1 Integrase

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute discovered small-molecule compounds whose activity against HIV-1 integrase mutants confer greater resistance than currently approved INSTIs. Preliminary DMPK and ADME studies have been completed by the NCI researchers. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to commercialize this class of compounds through licensing or co-development.

A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

New Insect Sf9-ET Cell Line for Determining Baculovirus Titers

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing partners for a novel modified insect cell line, Sf9-ET, that can quickly and efficiently determine baculovirus titers during the expression of recombinant proteins from a baculovirus-based protein expression system.

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