You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 61-80 of 283 results found

Cancer-reactive T cells from Peripheral Blood

T-cells capable of reacting to mutations in cancer patients have potential use as therapeutics. Identifying and isolating these cells from patients is a crucial step in developing these treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from a patient’s peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The NCI, Surgery Branch, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize this method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from peripheral blood.

CD206 Small Molecule Modulators, Their Use and Methods for Preparation

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a small molecule that binds to CD206 and activates M2-like tumor associated macrophages resulting in innate and adaptive anti-tumor responses. NCI seeks research co-development or licensees for CD206 small molecule modulators as a therapeutic for CD206-expressing cancers (such as pancreatic, sarcoma, head and neck, lung, gastric, triple negative breast, renal cell, colorectal cancer, melanoma).

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

Chimeric Adaptor Proteins (CAPs) Containing a Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) and a Kinase Domain for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapy

There remains a need for effective immunotherapies to treat solid tumors as well as hematological malignancies. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have designed novel chimeric adaptor proteins (CAPs) consisting of signaling molecules downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) for use in T cell-mediated immunotherapy. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing CAPs that can be used in immunotherapy for treating cancer, including both hematological and solid malignancies.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors that Recognize Mesothelin for Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the NCI have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) with a high affinity for mesothelin to be used as an immunotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and mesothelioma. Cells that express CARs, most notably T cells, are highly reactive against their specific tumor antigen in an MHC-unrestricted manner to generate an immune response that promotes robust tumor cell elimination when infused into cancer patients.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

Clinical Outcome Predictors for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

The invention is a novel methodology for predicting a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cancer patient’s survival prognosis. This information is important in helping determine the best course of treatment for the patient.

Combination Cancer Therapy with HDAC Inhibitors

NCI researchers developed a combination therapy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and immunotherapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, virus-based vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, cell-based treatments or radiopharmaceuticals. The NCI Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology seeks parties to license or co-develop this method.

Combination of Near Infrared Photoimmunotherapy Targeting Cancer Cells and Host-Immune Activation

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek co-development partners and/or licensees for a new therapeutic approach that selectively targets cancer cells and prevents tumor regrowth. The novel method combines antibody-IR700 molecules and Near-Infrared Photo Immunotherapy (NIR-PIT), which has shown great potential in targeting tumors via a host immunogenic response, with already known and available anti-cancer immunomodulators to further enhance the antitumor response. The investigators have shown in mouse models that, when used in combination, NIR-PIT-treatment and standard antitumor agents conferred a potent vaccine-like effect, not only curing mice of local and distant cancers but successfully immunizing them against tumor regrowth.

Pages