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Assays for Measuring and Quantifying DNA Damage

The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of assays for determining the levels of gamma-H2AX/H2AX to measure and quantify DNA damage.

Detection of Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Water Supplies

Testing for biological activity of glucocorticoids and many other steroid endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has not been previously performed. An automated, highly reproducible, and low cost assay detects biologically active steroidal EDCs and is suitable for wide application in testing water samples. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative co-development research and/or licensing to move this technology into the public domain.

Human T Cell Receptors for Treating Cancer

T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins that recognize antigens in the context of infected or transformed cells and activate T cells to mediate an immune response and destroy abnormal cells. The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch seeks interested parties to license or co-develop the use of T cell receptors (TCRs) cloned against the SSX-2 antigen for the treatment of cancer.

3D Image Rendering Softwarefor Biological Tissues

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop software for the automatic 3-D visualization of biological image volumes.

Near-IR Light-Cleavable Antibody Conjugates and Conjugate Precursors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel groups of cyanine (Cy) based antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) chemical linkers that undergo photolytic cleavage upon irradiation with near-IR light. By using the fluorescent properties of the Cy linker to monitor localization of the ADC, and subsequent near-IR irradiation of cancerous tissue, drug release could be confined to the tumor microenvironment.

Methods of analyzing virus-derived therapeutics

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Biopharmaceutical Development Program recently developed massively parallel sequencing methods for virus-derived therapeutics such as viral vaccines and oncolytic immunotherapies, for which the NCI seeks licensees or co-development collaborations.

Diagnostic Assay for Determining Patient Response to Apoptosis-related Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a multiplex assay to determine the efficacy of apoptosis-related drugs targeting the Bcl2 family of proteins or aid in the selection of cancer patients likely to respond. The NCI seeks partners for co-development or licensees for commercialization of novel immunoassays for determining or predicting patient response to cancer therapy.

Non-invasive Methods for Characterizing Adrenocortical Tumors

Researchers at the NCI developed a non-invasive method for distinguishing benign from malignant adrenocortical tumors using urine samples. The NCI seeks parties to co-develop a non-invasive, diagnostic method of distinguishing between benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors through the analysis of metabolites using urine samples.

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

A Viral Exposure Signature to Define and Detect Early Onset Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have identified a biomarker signature of viral infection that correlates with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) incidence in at-risk individuals. It has been validated in a longitudinal cohort to detect HCC with high sensitivity and specificity up to 7 years prior to clinical diagnosis. This viral exposure signature can be easily implemented into diagnostic assays for screening of HCC and is available for licensing and/or co-development opportunities.

Molecular Classification of Primary Mediastinal Large B Cell Lymphoma Using Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a gene-expression profiling-based molecular diagnostic assay to diagnose and classify primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma (PMBCL) from diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The diagnosis can be done using routinely available formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies. The NCI seeks licensees and/or co-development partners to commercialize this technology.

Reporter Plasmid to Identify Cancer Stem Cells

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics seeks partners to co-develop lentiviral plasmids, a research tool for visualizing and purifying cancer stem cells.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

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