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IgG4 Hinge Containing Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Glypican-1 For Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute have developed a glypican-1 (GPC1) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells using short immunoglobin subclass 4 (IgG4) hinge sequences that are highly potent against GPC1-expressing tumors. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees to advance the development of GPC1-IgG4 hinge CARs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other GPC1-expressing tumors.

Combination of Near Infrared Photoimmunotherapy Targeting Cancer Cells and Host-Immune Activation

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek co-development partners and/or licensees for a new therapeutic approach that selectively targets cancer cells and prevents tumor regrowth. The novel method combines antibody-IR700 molecules and Near-Infrared Photo Immunotherapy (NIR-PIT), which has shown great potential in targeting tumors via a host immunogenic response, with already known and available anti-cancer immunomodulators to further enhance the antitumor response. The investigators have shown in mouse models that, when used in combination, NIR-PIT-treatment and standard antitumor agents conferred a potent vaccine-like effect, not only curing mice of local and distant cancers but successfully immunizing them against tumor regrowth.

New Heterocyclic Scaffold-Based Inhibitors of the Polo-Box Domain of Polo-like Kinase 1 for the Treatment of Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) have developed novel heterocyclic scaffold-based inhibitors of the polo-box domain (PBD) of Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). These compounds effectively arrest mitotic progression and cell proliferation in cell-based assays. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop these inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

Method of Neoantigen-Reactive T Cell Receptor (TCR) Isolation from Peripheral Blood of Cancer Patients

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a novel method for isolation and construction of neoantigen-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of cancer patients. This method generates accurate scoring of single T cells from tumors, as well as facilitates identification and reconstruction of unknown TCRs for immunotherapy.

Genetically Modified Hematopoietic Stem And Progenitor Cells (HSPCs) And Mesenchymal Cells As A Platform To Reduce Or Prevent Metastasis, Treat Autoimmune And Inflammatory Disorders, And Rebalance The Immune Milieu And Dysregulated Niches

There is a marked increase in immunosuppressive myeloid progenitors and myeloid cells in tumors and at metastatic tissue sites, rendering these types of cells useful in cancer therapeutics – especially after genetic modifications to improve their anti-tumor properties. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development or licensing for genetically engineered myeloid cells (GEMys) for use in cancer immunotherapy.

Synergistic Use of Exo VII Inhibitors And Quinolone Antibiotics For Treating Bacterial Infection

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a bacterial exonuclease VII (ExoVII) inhibitor that increases the potency of widely used quinolone antibiotics targeting prokaryotic type IIA topoisomerases. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of ExoVII inhibitors as new antibiotic adjuvants to boost the efficacy of quinolone antibiotics and/or restore the susceptibility of resistant bacteria.

Extremely Rapid Method to Isolate Neoantigen Reactive T Cell Receptors (TCRs)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method for identifying neoantigen reactive T cells and T cell receptors (TCRs), isolated from fresh tumors of common epithelial cancers. This highly specific and sensitive method allows rapid determination of the neoantigen reactive TCR sequences and can be very useful to translate this information into TCR-engineered T-cell populations for immunotherapy without the need to grow tumor infiltrating T-cells and expensive, time-consuming screening. The NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for this invention.

Nanobodies Neutralizing Lassa Virus

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek parties interested in collaborative research and/or licensing to further develop neutralizing nanobodies targeting Lassa virus as a possible treatment of Lassa virus infections.

In vitro Generation of an Autologous Thymic Organoid from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

The thymus is the only organ capable of producing conventional, mature T cells; a crucial part of the adaptive immune system. However, its efficiency and function are progressively reduced as we age, leading to a compromised immune system in the elderly. Moreover, production of T cells with specific receptors is an important concern for cancer immunotherapy. Current in vitro methods produce immature T cells that are not useful for therapy. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have generated an autologous thymic organoid from human pluripotent stem cells to address this problem. The organoid can be used to develop clinical applications such as production of autologous T and natural killer T (NKT) cells and reconstitution of the adaptive immune system. NCI is seeking licensees for the thymic organoid and the method of its generation to be used in a variety of clinical applications.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. The NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations.

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