You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 1-20 of 200 results found

Adjuvanted Mucosal Subunit Vaccines for Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Transmission and Infection

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered an adjuvanted mucosal subunit vaccine to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission and infection. The mucosal vaccine is composed of a novel molecular adjuvant nanoparticle that induces robust humoral and cellular immunity, as well as trained innate immunity with enhanced protection against respiratory SARS-CoV-2 exposure. The technology is available for potential licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.

siRNA Delivery Using Hexameric Tetrahedral RNA Nanostructures for Gene Silencing

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), developed a tetrahedral-shaped RNA nanoparticle for the delivery of siRNA to activate RNAi. The tetrahedral RNA nanoparticles can contain twelve Dicer substrate RNA duplexes for gene silencing. The NCI seeks parties interested in co-development or licensing of these tetrahedral RNA nanoparticles.

Synthetic lipopeptide inhibitors of RAS oncoproteins

It is well known that overactive Ras signaling is linked to many forms of cancer, and despite intensive efforts worldwide to develop effective inhibitors of Ras, to date there is no anti-Ras inhibitor in clinical use. Researchers at the NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, in collaboration with scientists at Vanderbilt University and the University of Illinois in Chicago, have identified a number of small peptidomimetic compounds that bind to Ras proteins with nanomolar affinity. NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of synthetic, highly potent cell-permeable inhibitors of Ras that bind to the protein directly.

Human T Cell Receptors for Treating Cancer

T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins that recognize antigens in the context of infected or transformed cells and activate T cells to mediate an immune response and destroy abnormal cells. The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch seeks interested parties to license or co-develop the use of T cell receptors (TCRs) cloned against the SSX-2 antigen for the treatment of cancer.

Small Molecule Anti-cancer Agents that Stabilize the MYC-G-Quadruplex

The proto-oncogene c-Myc is deregulated and overexpressed in ~70% of all cancers. Thus, c-Myc is an attractive therapeutic target. Beyond cancer, Myc is also a positive effector of tissue inflammation, and its function has been implicated in the pathophysiology of heart failure. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel small molecules that target c-Myc at the transcriptional level, thus enabling a potential pan-cancer therapeutic. Specifically, these compounds stabilize the transcription repressing quadruplex in the c-Myc gene promoter region. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.'

T Cell Receptors Targeting p53 Mutations for Cancer Immunotherapy and Adoptive Cell Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute identified a collection of TCRs that exclusively recognize the common hotspot driver mutations in p53 tumor suppressor, expressed by a variety of human cancers, including colorectal, breast and lung cancers. The mutated p53 variants are recognized by the TCRs in the context of specific Class I/Class II HLA alleles. These TCRs can be used for a variety of experimental therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications.'

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

Small Molecule Inhibitors of Drug Resistant Forms of HIV-1 Integrase

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute discovered small-molecule compounds whose activity against HIV-1 integrase mutants confer greater resistance than currently approved INSTIs. Preliminary DMPK and ADME studies have been completed by the NCI researchers. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to commercialize this class of compounds through licensing or co-development.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). The compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Anti-SLAMF7 Chimeric Antigen Receptors

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapies that specifically target Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule F7 (SLAMF7) are strong therapeutic candidates for patients with Multiple Myeloma (MM). SLAMF7 is highly expressed on the malignant plasma cells that constitute MM. The expression of SLAMF7 by MM cells and lack of expression on nonhematologic cells makes SLAMF7 an attractive therapeutic target for MM. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have invented anti- SLAMF7 CAR constructs that allow genetically-modified T cells to express both the anti-SLAMF7 antibody and a suicide gene that allows T cells to specifically recognize and kill SLAMF7-expressing cells as well as allow for on-demand and reliable elimination of anti-SLAMF7 CAR T cells. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

Novel Anti-HIV Proteins from Coral Reefs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory have discovered that Cnidarins as a novel class of highly potent proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T-cells. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to license or co-develop large-scale recombinant production of cnidarins.

Brachyury-directed Vaccine for the Prevention or Treatment of Cancers

Researchers at the NCI have developed a vaccine technology that stimulates the immune system to selectively destroy metastasizing cells. Stimulation of T cells with the Brachyury peptide promote a robust immune response and lead to targeted lysis of invasive tumor cells. NCI seeks licensing or co-development of this invention.

Scytovirin Domain 1 Related Polypeptides

Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for novel anti-HIV peptide therapeutics. The researchers developed novel proteins for HIV inhibition. Scytovirin is a potent anti-HIV protein with two domains having strong symmetry. NCI researchers produced a much smaller, functional, scytovirin domain polypeptide – SD1 – for use as a HIV therapeutic.

Increased Therapeutic Effectiveness of PE-Based Immunotoxins

To improve the therapeutic effectiveness of PE-based immunotoxins through multiple rounds of drug administration, NIH inventors have sought to identify and remove the human B cell epitopes within PE. Previous work demonstrated that the removal of the murine B cell and T cell epitopes from PE reduced the immunogenicity of PE and resulted in immunotoxins with improved therapeutic activity. The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Molecular Biology seeks interested parties to co-develop and commercialize immunotoxins using toxin domains lacking human B cell epitopes.

Pages