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Nitroxyl (HNO) Releasing Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing therapeutic agents that generate Nitroxyl (HNO) in physiological media.

New Heterocyclic Scaffold-Based Inhibitors of the Polo-Box Domain of Polo-like Kinase 1 for the Treatment of Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) have developed novel heterocyclic scaffold-based inhibitors of the polo-box domain (PBD) of Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). These compounds effectively arrest mitotic progression and cell proliferation in cell-based assays. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop these inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

EGFRvIII Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated seven monoclonal antibodies that bind to the human epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) but not wildtype EGFR. The NCI seeks research co-development partners or licensees for monoclonal antibodies that specifically target cancer-expressed EGFR.

New T-Cell Immunotherapy that Targets Aggressive Epithelial Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch (NCI ETIB) developed a T Cell receptor that specifically targets the Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen 1 (KK-LC-1) 52-60 epitope that is highly expressed by several common and aggressive epithelial tumor types.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors

Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

Increased Therapeutic Effectiveness of PE-Based Immunotoxins

To improve the therapeutic effectiveness of PE-based immunotoxins through multiple rounds of drug administration, NIH inventors have sought to identify and remove the human B cell epitopes within PE. Previous work demonstrated that the removal of the murine B cell and T cell epitopes from PE reduced the immunogenicity of PE and resulted in immunotoxins with improved therapeutic activity. The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Molecular Biology seeks interested parties to co-develop and commercialize immunotoxins using toxin domains lacking human B cell epitopes.

Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

Cancer Therapeutic based on Stimulation of Natural Killer T-cell Anti-tumor Activity

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute''s Vaccine Branch have found that beta-mannosylceramide (Beta-ManCer) promotes immunity in an IFN-gamma independent mechanism and seek statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize beta-ManCer.

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

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