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Diagnostic Assay for Determining Patient Response to Apoptosis-related Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a multiplex assay to determine the efficacy of apoptosis-related drugs targeting the Bcl2 family of proteins or aid in the selection of cancer patients likely to respond. The NCI seeks partners for co-development or licensees for commercialization of novel immunoassays for determining or predicting patient response to cancer therapy.

Non-invasive Methods for Characterizing Adrenocortical Tumors

Researchers at the NCI developed a non-invasive method for distinguishing benign from malignant adrenocortical tumors using urine samples. The NCI seeks parties to co-develop a non-invasive, diagnostic method of distinguishing between benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors through the analysis of metabolites using urine samples.

Transgenic Mouse Model of Human Basal Triple Negative Breast Cancer

NIH scientists created and characterized an excellent mouse model for TNBC that shares important molecular characteristics of human TNBC making it highly useful for preclinical testing of drugs and novel therapies. This model may provide a valuable means of identifying new drugs and therapies that could be translated to human clinical trials.The NCI seeks parties interested in licensing this mouse model of prostate and triple-negative breast cancers to study cancer biology and for preclinical testing.

Peptide Hydrogels for Rate-Controlled Delivery of Therapeutics

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel delivery platform in which the scaffold of an anionic hydrogel (AcVES3) can be attenuated to deliver therapeutic small molecules, peptides, proteins, nanoparticles, or whole cells. The NCI seeks collaborators and licensees for the development of this technology in various clinical and laboratory applications.

High Affinity Nanobodies Targeting B7-H3 (CD276) for Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated a panel of anti-CD276 (also called B7-H3) single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies). These antibodies have a high affinity for CD276-positive tumor cells and have great potential for diagnostic and therapeutic technologies against solid tumors. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for CD276-targeting camel nanobodies.

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

Fully-human Heavy-chain-only Anti-B-cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs)

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapies that specifically target B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) are strong therapeutic candidates for patients with plasma cell malignancy diseases such as, multiple myeloma (MM), as well as for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. BCMA is a cell surface protein preferentially expressed on a subset of B cells and mature plasma cells, but not on other cells in the body. The limited expression of BCMA on B and plasma cells makes BCMA an attractive therapeutic target for B cell and plasma cell malignancy diseases. The 12 anti-BCMA CARs described are fully human CARS and have the potential to treat patients with various plasma cell and B cell malignancy diseases.

Schweinfurthins and Uses Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel analogs of the natural product schweinfurthins to treat neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The compounds demonstrate effective growth inhibition in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cell lines and mouse models of astrocytomas. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaboration opportunities to further develop the schweinfurthin analogs.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain (“Plk1 PBD Portfolio”)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). These compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Scytovirin Domain 1 Related Polypeptides

Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for novel anti-HIV peptide therapeutics. The researchers developed novel proteins for HIV inhibition. Scytovirin is a potent anti-HIV protein with two domains having strong symmetry. NCI researchers produced a much smaller, functional, scytovirin domain polypeptide – SD1 – for use as a HIV therapeutic.

Therapeutic Immunotoxins with Increased Half-Life and Anti-Tumor Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for mesothelin targeting Recombinant Immunotoxins (RITs). These RITs have been engineered by site specific modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to have an increased serum half-life, while maintaining high cytotoxicity and have greatly improved anti-tumor activity.

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

T Cell Receptors Targeting KRAS Mutants for Cancer Immunotherapy/Adoptive Cell Therapy

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have identified a collection of TCRs that exclusively recognize the common hotspot driver mutations in KRAS antigen, expressed by a variety of epithelial cancers, including pancreatic, colorectal and lung cancer. The mutated KRAS variants are recognized by the TCRs in the context of specific Class I/Class II HLA alleles. These TCRs can be used for a variety of experimental therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications.

A Viral Exposure Signature to Define and Detect Early Onset Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have identified a biomarker signature of viral infection that correlates with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) incidence in at-risk individuals. It has been validated in a longitudinal cohort to detect HCC with high sensitivity and specificity up to 7 years prior to clinical diagnosis. This viral exposure signature can be easily implemented into diagnostic assays for screening of HCC and is available for licensing and/or co-development opportunities.

Methods for Producing Stem Cell-Like Memory T Cells for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research & co-development and/or licensees for a novel, ex vivo method by which stem cell-like memory T cells (Tscm) can be generated by stimulating naïve T cells in the presence of inhibitors of GSK-3beta, which are capable of activating the Wnt pathway. These Tscm cells, generated using GSK-3beta inhibitors, display enhanced survival and proliferation upon transfer, have multipotent capacity to generate all memory and effector T cell subsets, and show increased anti-tumor activity in a humanized mouse tumor model.

Module to Freeze and Store Frozen Tissue

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an engineered storage unit for frozen tissue, that provides a permanent base on which to mount tissue frozen in OCT and an enclosure for storage. The unit provides for chain-of-custody labeling and acts as an insulating container to protect the specimen. Other elements include devices for freezing the tissue to the base, as well as a holder for the base to facilitate cryosectioning. Application of the storage system allows a frozen tissue specimen to be moved between storage and cryosectioning without loss of label, deformation of tissue, or thermal alterations.

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