You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 41-60 of 281 results found

Murine metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed orthotopic allograft models for pancreatic cancer that utilize cells or tumor fragments implanted into the cancer-free pancreata of recipient immunocompetent mice. NCI seeks licensees to commercialize this invention.

Methods of Producing Thymic Emigrants from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of T cells for a variety of clinical applications. However, current in vitro methods of T cell differentiation result in the generation of cells with aberrant phenotypes. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have now developed methodology for generating induced pluripotent stem cell thymic emigrants (iTE). Antigen-specific CD8αβ+ iTEs exhibited functional properties in vitro that were almost indistinguishable from natural naïve CD8αβ+ T cells, including vigorous expansion and robust anti-tumor activity. iTEs recapitulated many of the transcriptional programs of naïve T cells in vivo and revealed a striking capacity for engraftment, memory formation, and efficient tumor destruction. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Near-IR Light-Cleavable Antibody Conjugates and Conjugate Precursors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel groups of cyanine (Cy) based antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) chemical linkers that undergo photolytic cleavage upon irradiation with near-IR light. By using the fluorescent properties of the Cy linker to monitor localization of the ADC, and subsequent near-IR irradiation of cancerous tissue, drug release could be confined to the tumor microenvironment.

Device to guide oxygen over cells for photo-oxidation

Device is used to guide a stream of oxygen or carbon dioxide over a dish of cells during fluorescence microscopy. Invention includes the 3D printing software to create the device. The device makes it possible to easily provide a steady source of oxygen or carbon dioxide to cells while operating a fluorescent microscope to oxidize fluorophores for later visualization in electron microscopy. NCI seeks commercial partners to license this technology.

The UBE2G2 Binding Domain in the Ubiquitin Ligase GP78 and Methods of Use Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing the binding domain (G2BD) for the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ube2G2 in the gp78 ubiqutin ligase protein. The invention involves modulating the interaction between the gp78 protein and the conjugating enzyme Ube2G2. Interruption of this interaction will block degradation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in ER stress, unfolded protein response, and, ultimately, apoptosis in some cancer cells. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

Device for Growing Mammalian Cells on EM Grids

A device used to hold transmission electron microscopy grids that allows adherent mammalian cells to grow on and the 3D printing software to create the device, which the NCI seeks to license.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

Micro-Dose Calibrator for Pre-clinical Radiotracer Assays

Pre-clinical radiotracer biomedical research involves the use of compounds labeled with radioisotopes, including radio-ligand bio-distribution studies, cell binding studies, immune cell labeling techniques, and α-based therapies. Before this Micro-Dose Calibrator, measurement of pre-clinical level dosage for small animal studies was inaccurate and unreliable. This dose calibrator is a prototype ready for customer testing and scale-up. It is designed to accurately measure radioactive doses in the range of 50 nCi (1.8 kBq) to 100 µCi (3.7 MBq) with 99% precision. The NCI seeks co-development or licensing to commercialize it. Alternative uses will be considered.

Methods of analyzing virus-derived therapeutics

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Biopharmaceutical Development Program recently developed massively parallel sequencing methods for virus-derived therapeutics such as viral vaccines and oncolytic immunotherapies, for which the NCI seeks licensees or co-development collaborations.

Bioluminescent Bladder Cancer Cell Line for Tracking Cancer Progression

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a bioluminescent MB49-luciferase bladder cancer cell line that can be used in preclinical studies to evaluate anti-cancer agents in bladder cancer. NCI seeks parties to non-exclusively license this research material.

T Cell Receptors Targeting p53 Hotspot Mutations and Methods of Isolating the Same

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) identified a collection of T Cell Receptors (TCRs) that target specific mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor protein. These TCRs recognize “hotspot” mutations, which frequently occur in a variety of unrelated cancers. These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel T cell receptors that recognize p53 mutations and methods for identifying p53 mutation-reactive T cell receptors.

Genetic Assay for Transcription Errors: Methods to Monitor Treatments or Chemicals that Increase the Error Rate of RNA synthesis

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a genetic assay for detecting transcription errors in RNA synthesis. This new assay extends the familiar concept of an Ames test which monitors DNA damage and synthesis errors to the previously inaccessible issue of RNA synthesis fidelity. The FDA requires genetic DNA focused tests for all drug approval as it assesses the in vivo mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a drug. The new assay will open an approach to monitoring the impact of treatments on the accuracy of RNA synthesis. Errors in transcription have been hypothesized to be a component of aging and age-related diseases. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing partners for the genetic assay.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. The NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations.

Pages