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Biomarker signature development: microRNAs for biodosimetry

Alterations in microRNAs (miRNAs), a type of small non-coding RNAs, have been reported in cells/tumors subjected to radiation exposure, implying that miRNAs play an important role in cellular stress response to radiation. NCI researchers evaluated small non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), and mRNA, as potential non-invasive biomarkers for radiation biodosimetry. The NCI Radiation Oncology Branch seeks parties interested in licensing or co-development of RNA biomarker signature(s) for radiation biodosimetry.

Reporter Plasmid to Identify Cancer Stem Cells

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics seeks partners to co-develop lentiviral plasmids, a research tool for visualizing and purifying cancer stem cells.

Diagnostic Assays for the Detection of Thyroid Cancer

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child and Human Development’s (NICHD) Pediatric Growth and Nutrition Branch seek partners to co-develop a diagnostic assay to detect thyroid cancer.

Gene Signature for Predicting Solid Tumors Patient Prognosis

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis seeks parties to license or co-develop a method of predicting the prognosis of a patient diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or breast cancer by detecting expression of one or more cancer-associated genes, and a method of identifying an agent for use in treating HCC.

GTF2I Mutations as a Genetic Marker for Prognosis of Thymic Malignancies

Despite the growing number of biomarkers that are used for diagnosing and treating carcinomas in general, cancers of the thymus are still diagnosed, stratified and treated by a costly combination of histology, surgery and radiological procedures.  The lack of qualified biomarkers associated with thymomas and thymic carcinomas has also hampered the development of targeted therapies. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a prognostic PCR based test for thymic malignancies.

Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C

NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

Human T Cell Receptors for Treating Cancer

T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins that recognize antigens in the context of infected or transformed cells and activate T cells to mediate an immune response and destroy abnormal cells. The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch seeks interested parties to license or co-develop the use of T cell receptors (TCRs) cloned against the SSX-2 antigen for the treatment of cancer.

Assays for Measuring and Quantifying DNA Damage

The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of assays for determining the levels of gamma-H2AX/H2AX to measure and quantify DNA damage.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

Near-IR Light-Cleavable Antibody Conjugates and Conjugate Precursors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel groups of cyanine (Cy) based antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) chemical linkers that undergo photolytic cleavage upon irradiation with near-IR light. By using the fluorescent properties of the Cy linker to monitor localization of the ADC, and subsequent near-IR irradiation of cancerous tissue, drug release could be confined to the tumor microenvironment.

Urine-based Diagnostic Assay for the Early Detection of Cancer

Researchers at the NCI have developed a urine-based diagnostic platform capable of predicting the onset of cancer. This high-throughput screening method quantifies metabolites to assess cancer risk, determine disease prognosis and monitor response to therapy.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors that Recognize Mesothelin for Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the NCI have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) with a high affinity for mesothelin to be used as an immunotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and mesothelioma. Cells that express CARs, most notably T cells, are highly reactive against their specific tumor antigen in an MHC-unrestricted manner to generate an immune response that promotes robust tumor cell elimination when infused into cancer patients.

A Rabbit Anti-pT1989 ATR Monoclonal Antibody for Use in Immunoassays

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a monoclonal antibody against ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase phosphorylated at threonine 1989. The antibody can be used for pharmacodynamic assays to quantify drug action on the ATR target.

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