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Use of Heterodimeric IL-15 in Adoptive Cell Transfer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a technology that provides methods of performing adoptive cell transfer (ACT), an immunotherapeutic approach for cancer treatment, by administering a heterodimeric Interleukin 15/Interleukin 15 receptor alpha (IL-15/IL-15Rα) complex (hetlL-15) in the absence of lymphodepletion, thereby eliminating any lymphodepletion-associated detrimental side effects.

Efficient Methods to Prepare Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in vitro for Therapeutic Use

Multi-potential hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) can differentiate into any class of blood cells, and are highly useful in regenerative medicine, immunology, and cancer immunotherapy. Current methods to generate HPCs are limited either due to the use of animal products, or the high cost and low efficiency of animal product free systems. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a protocol to prepare HPCs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture condition. Thus, they are able to generate HPCs in a fully human, autologous system, which can be used to further generate immune cells for therapy. This protocol is adaptable to mass production by bioreactors. NCI seeks licensees for these methods of generating HPCs in a 3D co-culture with hMSCs to be used in a variety of applications such as treatment of blood disorders, regenerative medicine, and antibody production.

In vitro Generation of an Autologous Thymic Organoid from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

The thymus is the only organ capable of producing conventional, mature T cells; a crucial part of the adaptive immune system. However, its efficiency and function are progressively reduced as we age, leading to a compromised immune system in the elderly. Moreover, production of T cells with specific receptors is an important concern for cancer immunotherapy. Current in vitro methods produce immature T cells that are not useful for therapy. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have generated an autologous thymic organoid from human pluripotent stem cells to address this problem. The organoid can be used to develop clinical applications such as production of autologous T and natural killer T (NKT) cells and reconstitution of the adaptive immune system. NCI is seeking licensees for the thymic organoid and the method of its generation to be used in a variety of clinical applications.

SMAD3 Reporter Mouse for Assessing TGF-ß/Activin Pathway Activation

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel mouse for the detection of TGF-ß signaling. This mouse provides the opportunity to study TGF-ß signaling in vivo and may be a useful model for preclinical pharmacology studies. The NCI seeks licensees for the TGF-ß reporter mouse.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

Reporter Plasmid to Identify Cancer Stem Cells

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics seeks partners to co-develop lentiviral plasmids, a research tool for visualizing and purifying cancer stem cells.

Cancer-reactive T cells from Peripheral Blood

T-cells capable of reacting to mutations in cancer patients have potential use as therapeutics. Identifying and isolating these cells from patients is a crucial step in developing these treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from a patient’s peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The NCI, Surgery Branch, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize this method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from peripheral blood.

Synthetic Lethality-mediated Precision Oncology via the Tumor Transcriptome

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed SELECT (synthetic lethality and rescue-mediated precision oncology via the transcriptome), a computational precision-oncology framework harnessing genetic interactions to improve treatment options for cancer patients. NCI seeks collaborators or licensees to advance the development of this technology into precision diagnostics.

T-cell Receptors Targeting CD20-Positive Lymphomas and Leukemias

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for a collection of T-cell receptors (TCRs) that specifically target the CD20 antigen expressed in B-lymphoid malignancies such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The TCRs are being developed as therapeutics for the treatment of lymphomas and leukemias.

Development and Characterization of the SLC46A3 Knockout Mouse Line

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for an SLC46A3 knockout mouse line. SLC46A3 is a solute carrier of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and is thought to have roles in multiple diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, liver cancer and obesity.

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